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‘Fear Hacking’ Is the New Positive Thinking

https://forge.medium.com/fear-hacking-is-the-new-positive-thinking-7019ec5dc4a5

forge.medium.com

‘Fear Hacking’ Is the New Positive Thinking
Anticipation and preparedness will improve your performance, no matter the outcome

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Fear hacking

Fear hacking

Fear hacking implies picturing the worst-case scenario and making sure, through action, that you are able to manage any difficult situation that can arise.

The first step after having imagined this scenario, is to create a plan to fight it if this should come true.

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Embrace your fears

Whenever you feel afraid of the possible outcome of your actions, just go ahead imagining what could go wrong.

Next, plan what exactly you would you if things were to not work well. Finally, you will be surprised to see that nothing is really that hard as long as you are well prepared both mentally and physically.

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Extreme Uncertainty: The Effects

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Establish what you can control

Recognize that in most situations, all you can control is your effort and your attitude. 

When you put your energy into the things you can control, you'll be much more effective.

Your influence

You can influence people and circumstances, but you can't force things to go your way:

  • To have the most influence, focus on changing your behavior. Be a good role model and set healthy boundaries for yourself.
  • When you have concerns about someone else's choices, share your opinion, but only share it once. Don't try to fix people who don't want to be fixed.

Identify your fears

Think about what you could do when failure happens.

Usually, the worst-case scenario isn't as tragic as you might envision. Acknowledging that you can handle the worst-case scenario can help you put your energy into more productive exercises.

Suffering from the fear of heights

Suffering from the fear of heights

People that have acrophobia have an irrational fear of heights. Many symptoms of acrophobia are shared with other anxiety disorders, such as shaking, sweating, a racing heart, diff...

Challenge your beliefs about heights

People with height phobias think something bad will happen when they are up high. But you are safer than you think and your feared outcome about heights won't really happen.
Ask yourself:

  • What do you believe will happen when you expose yourself to your fear?
  • How likely do you think it is that this would happen?
  • What would be the outcome of it happening? (you might believe a tall building will collapse.)

Once you've answered the questions, start small with the thing you fear and see that the worst doesn't actually happen, or that it is not as bad as you feared.

The cause of acrophobia

  • A traumatic or frightening event, such as falling off a ladder could cause a fear of heights because the distressing experience gets paired with heights in the person's memories.
  • However, many people can't link their fear to a particular experience.
  • Some people that fear heights did not have repeated safe exposure to heights.
  • Finally, people with height phobia show subtle differences in their ability to maintain their balance, partly because they have more difficulty integrating perceptual information from their visual system.