My Productivity System. How I Use a Calendar and a To-Do List to Stay Organised - Magoz Blog - Deepstash

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My Productivity System. How I Use a Calendar and a To-Do List to Stay Organised - Magoz Blog

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My Productivity System. How I Use a Calendar and a To-Do List to Stay Organised - Magoz Blog
Every day, we have to complete lots of tasks. And since it's the beginning of the year, many of us have set up some goals we want to achieve. In most cases, nobody has taught us how to stay organised and we ended up finding our own solutions.

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Tips On How To Set Up To Do Lists

  • Start task names with a verb to make them more descriptive and easy to understand.
  • Break each task into smaller tasks.
  • Create temporary lists

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Examples Of To Do Lists

  • Personal: for tasks that only apply to your personal life and are somewhat time sensitive.
  • Work: for work related tasks. You may want to create sister lists if your work ...

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Basic Steps For Using a To-Do List

  1. Add tasks as they appear to the appropriate list, assigning a due date if possible.
  2. Before the day ends, check your lists for the tasks you want to do the next day. You c...

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Tips On Using Calendars

  • Using calendars of different colors allows for easy identification.
  • Adding additional information like duration and address can save you time.
  • Sometimes it...

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The To-Do List vs. The Calendar

The to-do list is for tasks and always requires actions to be completed. Meanwhile, the calendar is for events that happen by themselves, and may require participation.

Some events req...

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The Benefits Of Apps Over Paper For Organization

  • Ease of access allows for usage on multiple platforms.
  • Moving and duplicating tasks without rewriting them.
  • Ability to set up alarms.
  • A pa...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The philosophy of working "smart"

... is to maximize your productivity when you are working so that you can get more stuff done in shorter periods of time.

By working smarter, you'll find yourself with more time in the day to sleep, exercise, be creative, and recharge. And the key to getting through your to-do list faster is by working smarter -- without sacrificing the quality of your work.

Find the to-do list app that work for you

The best one for you depends entirely on your working style and personal preferences.

You can use a physical notebook around everywhere you go, but it's easier to use a to-do list app or tool that syncs across all your devices. That way, you can access your to-do items whenever and wherever you need to, whether you're at your desk, in a meeting, or on a business trip.

Prepare in advance

Write out your to-do list the day before:

  • You'll free your time to dive right into your to-do list in the morning - one of the most productive times of day.
  • It can help you spot obstacles ahead of time and prepare accordingly.
  • Knowing what you have going on well in advance could help you relax and sleep better the night before.

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Take Stock and Track Your Time

You can’t really clean up your schedule if you don’t know what’s in it—and that includes all the things on your literal and official calendar and all the things that aren’t. 

Purge Recurring Meetings and Tasks

Once you know what’s on your calendar, ask yourself: “What is the purpose of each thing on here? Are we accomplishing that or does something need to change?” 

Question each task. Start with recurring meetings, which can very easily build up and take over your calendar.

Sort Things By Importance and Urgency

... and put them in one of four quadrants:

  • Quadrant I: Important, Urgent (crises, last-minute meetings for important deadlines)
  • Quadrant II: Important, Not Urgent (strategic planning, long-term goal setting)
  • Quadrant III: Not Important, Urgent (certain emails, phone calls, meetings, and events)
  • Quadrant IV: Not Important, Not Urgent (scrolling mindlessly through social media, binge-watching TV you don’t really care about).

1. Time-Blocking

Time-blocking consists of assigning individual tasks to manageable time slots.

Instead of writing out short tasks alongside hours-long tasks on your list for the day and hoping you have enough time to tackle it all, this approach lets you set realistic goals for yourself one task at a time.

2. If/then Lists

To set reasonable goals make a list for high-energy days and another for when you are reluctant to work. Both lists should follow an “if/then” model.

The first lists should have the more involved tasks, while the second list should feature more mindless tasks like cleaning out your inbox, organizing your desk, or even napping.

3. Eisenhower Matrix

An Eisenhower Matrix breaks a to-do list into the four categories below:
  1. Has items that are both urgent and important, is to be tackled immediately.
  2. Items that are important but not urgent, can be scheduled for a later time.
  3. Tasks deemed urgent but not important can be delegated to others if possible
  4. Tasks that are neither urgent nor important should be crossed off the list altogether.