Charismatic leaders

Charismatic leaders bring out our best and make us excel. Research shows that those following charismatic leaders perform better, find their work more meaningful, and have more trust in their leaders that those who follow non-charismatic leaders.

Charismatic leaders cause followers to become highly committed to the leader's mission and make personal sacrifices by mastering the art and science of personal magnetism.

@joshuamar

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Self Improvement

  • Speak slowly. Visualize the slow, emphatic tone of a judge delivering a verdict.
  • Pause. Those who show confidence often pause for a second or two between sentences.
  • Drop intonation. Lowering the tone of your voice at the end of a sentence sounds confident. You can even lower your intonation midsentence.
  • Check your breathing. Try not to breathe through your mouth as it can make you sound breathless and anxious. Instead, inhale and exhale through your nose.
  • Smile. Smiling projects more warmth in your voice. It's even worth doing when on the phone.

The use of imagery increases charisma.

Research shows that a high imagery speech resulted in higher ratings of charisma that a low imagery speech.

Consistency in tone is very persuasive. People who don't get stirred up and maintain a narrow tonal range have a natural advantage.

The more consistent they are in emphasis and rhythm, the more convincing they are to others. They are also perceived as having better ideas and a better presentation style.

It can do this by stripping away the emotional information in faces and intonation.

Virtual communication may dampen laughter that would otherwise happen face-to-face.

To become a charismatic manager, focus on these techniques:

  • Framing through metaphor-stories and anecdotes
  • Demonstrating moral conviction
  • Sharing the sentiments of the group
  • Setting high expectations
  • Communicating confidence
  • Using rhetorical devices such as contrasts, lists, and rhetorical questions together with non-verbal tactics such as body gesture, facial expression, and animated voice tone.

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Create An Emotional Connection

Body language is great for communicating confidence and certainty, while verbal communication is better for communicating knowledge and wisdom– so keep that in mind when considering what kind of emotional connection you want to establish, and don’t forget to channel your passion through these forms of communication.

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IDEAS

It is a well-known fact that most people quit due to bad bosses. This includes all the super-geniuses who would have driven the company towards growth and prosperity but were sidelined or diminished by lousy, insecure bosses.

An extensive study on more than fifty thousand leaders showed that only one in 2000 leaders can be unlikeable and still be successful.

Teams having likeable leaders tend to be stable and flourishing. A likeable leader makes the team members step out of their comfort zone and give their best, without forcing anything.

Most of the dangers of the charismatic movement relate to this power.

  • Charismatic leaders lose support more quickly than other types of leaders.
  • They have to clearly be the best person for the job at hand – always and in any situation. This is why they often engage in a cult of personality and become resistant to criticism.
  • Things that charismatic leaders do to maintain their power are precisely the things that diminish it when their business, country, or other undertaking encounters problems.
  • When charismatic leaders use their position to motivate their followers to do things they would not normally do, the followers often feel betrayed once they suspect that they might not get the expected payoff. 
  • They often eventually take the praise of their followers too seriously and show narcissistic traits. They consider criticism as disobedience and expect total loyalty. 

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