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The Mental Habit of Feeling Rushed & Overwhelmed : zen habits

https://zenhabits.net/relax-habit/

zenhabits.net

The Mental Habit of Feeling Rushed & Overwhelmed : zen habits
As we dive into the holiday season, it's easy to feel overwhelmed, rushed, even irritated by family members and others around us. I'd like to encourage you to try a mindfulness practice. Here's the practice: Notice each time you feel rushed, anxious or overwhelmed. Try to develop an awareness of it throughout the day.

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Practices To Handle Anxieties

Practices To Handle Anxieties
  • Notice each time you feel rushed, anxious or overwhelmed. Try to develop an awareness of it throughout the day and catch it soon.
  • When feeling rushed, catch yourself and pause. Then relax with what you feel, focus on the task at hand and enjoy it. 
  • When you feel anxious, notice your mental habit of letting anxiety carry you off into a chain reaction of worry. Pause, relax with what you feel, and then trust that you can handle the uncertainty at hand.
  • When feeling overwhelmed, notice your mental habit of thinking of being able to do your obligations. Pause, relax with what you feel and tackle one task at a time, breathing and enjoying each. 

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