deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Want to Lead a Happy Life? Science Says to Focus on These 10 Things.

https://www.becomingminimalist.com/science-happiness/

becomingminimalist.com

Want to Lead a Happy Life? Science Says to Focus on These 10 Things.
After a long, brutal winter, it feels great to be outside again in a t-shirt, even if the temperatures aren't climbing much beyond fifty degrees here in northern Michigan. In our community, which was recently buried in snow, people are out in force, combing beaches for rocks, riding bikes, hiking trails, cruising on paddle boards, and celebrating spring's arrival.

3

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Hedonic adaptation

It explains our tendency as human beings to chase happiness, only to return back to our original emotional baseline after getting what we want. 

We run on a hedonic treadmill, and get nowhere, despite exerting massive effort along the way.

330 SAVES

724 READS

VIEW

Tal Ben-Shahar

"Attaining lasting happiness requires that we enjoy the journey on our way toward a destination we deem valuable. Happiness is not about making it to the peak of the mountain nor is it about climbing aimlessly around the mountain; happiness is the experience of climbing toward the peak."

Tal Ben-Shahar

368 SAVES

645 READS

Cultivate More Happiness

Cultivate More Happiness
  • Find your right fit or match, both personally and professionally.
  • Appreciating life’s small moments.
  • Smile more, even if you don’t feel like it.
  • Perform random acts of kindness.
  • Spend money on experiences versus things.
  • Avoid comparisons.
  • Build and maintain close relationships.
  • Make little changes in your daily routine: getting more sleep, exercising, getting out into nature, and meditating.

675 SAVES

1.09k READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The arrival fallacy

It's our false belief that once we make it, once we attain our goal or reach our destination, we will reach lasting happiness.

It’s the strong belief that when you accomplish something...

Pursuing goals isn’t a problem

It becomes dangerous when you focus on attaining them for your happiness in life. 

Goal attainment is, at most, equally, if not less important than the progress towards the goal. 

Achievement doesn’t equal happiness

Achieving a goal usually reveals another, even more, challenging goal. This may bring in much more work because the pursuit of goals never ends.

3 more ideas

Hedonic Adaptation: Eternal Dissatisfaction

When we obtain our desires, needs and wants, we quickly get accustomed to it, taking those shiny toys for granted, and easily getting bored with them. We mistakenly look for happin...

Our Happiness Formula Is Wrong

We have, since the beginning, a wrong formula implanted in our minds about the pursuit of happiness. We think if we do amazing work, attain big success, then we will be happy eventually.

The reality is that new goals are constantly on the horizon, and our so-called happiness keeps getting pushed further and further away. This leads to a feeling of emptiness, not happiness or contentment when a goal is fulfilled.

Happiness Comes First, Then Success

The real formula for success is to be happy first. If you are happy, and your work is great as a result, excellence is assured, which leads to success.

A happy person gravitates towards positivity, intelligence, creativity and better energy, and success then has no choice but to be associated with the person.

Adaptation and happiness

Adaptation is the enemy of happiness.

We buy things to make us happy. And they do, but only for a while. New things are exciting to us at first, but then we adapt to them.

Experiences vs. Objects

Objects fade and become part of the new normal. So you’ll get more happiness spending money on experiences like going to art exhibits, doing outdoor activities, learning a new skill, or traveling. 

Experiences really are part of ourselves. We are the sum total of our experiences.

Shared experiences

They connect us more than shared consumption.

Even if someone wasn’t with you when you had a particular experience, you’re much more likely to bond over both having hiked the Appalachian Trail or seeing the same show than you are over both owning Fitbits.