5 Routines To Clear Mental Clutter - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

5 Routines To Clear Mental Clutter

https://www.fastcompany.com/3038455/5-routines-to-clear-mental-clutter

fastcompany.com

5 Routines To Clear Mental Clutter
That smartphone in your pocket? It's nearly doubling the amount of time you spend working. A 2013 survey by the Center for Creative Leadership found that the typical smartphone-carrying professional interacts with work an average of 72 hours a week. No wonder we're all so stressed out.

5

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Asking If This Is Necessary

Asking If This Is Necessary

When you feel overwhelmed, ask yourself if what you have to do is necessary. Depending on the answer reschedule, drop it or continue.

Keep in mind what’s the most important thing to get done, what could be postponed and what could be done by someone else. It’s not about ignoring tasks, it’s about refocusing.

220 SAVES

319 READS


VIEW

Time For Unconscious Thought

Time For Unconscious Thought

When you get away from work, you clear mental clutter and initiate unconscious thought. Delaying decisions until you’ve had time to simmer brings better results and lessens your sense of being overworked.

167 SAVES

248 READS


Visualizing The Future

Visualizing The Future

For those overwhelmed with worry about the future, create a routine of visualization. After taking a few deep breaths to clear your mind, envision the answer to the following questions:

  • What am I trying to do?
  • How do I need to show up to do that?

200 SAVES

245 READS


Learning Lessons Analysis

Learning Lessons Analysis

Lesson learned analysis is a process used to learn from the past and improve in the future. It helps clear out regret from past events.

Do that by asking yourself these three questions:

  • What was supposed to happen?
  • What actually happened?
  • What would I do differently next time?

188 SAVES

225 READS


Deep Breathing

Deep Breathing

Use the STOP acronym to remember the process. Stop what you’re doing. Take a breath. Observe what’s going on around you. Proceed. Awareness brings more intentionality and exercises your attention spam.

Deep breathing is a rhythmic repetitive motion and it helps to remove mental chatter because it can be done whenever and wherever you wish. As you breathe, put your hand on your stomach; if your hand is moving in and out you’re doing it right.

185 SAVES

244 READS


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Frequency of breath

Even though we have been breathing for all our lives, we can still learn a lot about this most basic instinct.

Quick, shallow, and unfocused breathing may contribute to anxiety, depression, ...

Breathwork

Breathwork is not the same as mindfulness. Mindfulness involves passive observation of the breath, whereas breathwork requires you to actively change the way you breathe.

Breathwork includes ensuring you breath with your diaphragm, rather than the movement of your chest. It will fill your lungs with more air while also slowing the pace of your breathing.

Speed ramp to relaxation

Right breathing can have a profound effect on calming the mind quickly and can act as a speed ramp into the meditation practice by getting you to that place of no-thought.

one more idea

Humans are wired to worry

As it turns out. Our brains are continually imagining futures that will meet our needs and things that could stand in the way of them. And sometimes any of those needs may be in conflict with each ...

The mind always needs something

We worry because our pre-conditioned mind cannot be left alone. Like a motor that cannot be switched off, the mind keeps running, performing background thinking at all times.

Studies show people would rather prefer to be electrocuted with mild electric shocks than to just sit in a room doing nothing.

Mindfulness

Mindfulness is a practice of observing our mind's activity and is the antidote to worry.

Mindfulness results in increased attention, better working memory, and an awareness of mind while enriching the neural connections of the brain.

Signs of Stress

  • Headaches
  • Chest pain
  • Fatigue
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Chest pains
  • Stomach ache
  • Hair loss
  • Eyelid twitching
  • Acne
  • Back pain

How to Manage Stress at Work

  • Take a deep breath. Slow, deep breaths activate your parasympathetic nervous system, which calms you down.
  • Don’t dwell on scary thoughts without any productive decisions.
  • Give yourself a break. Accept your negative emotions.
  • Exercise. Research suggests many of the benefits of exercise come in the first 20 minutes.

  • Reach out. In-person interactions cause your body to produce a bunch of hormones that counteract the “flight or flight” response.

  • Maintain a balanced lifestyle. 

  • Meditate.

  • Take notes of what tends to stress you out 

    so you can better control your reaction.
  • Set the right expectations. Treat stress like an inevitable part of your life. You’re not trying to erase stress, you’re simply trying to cope with it.