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The single biggest trait that contributes to your growth.

https://blog.usejournal.com/the-single-biggest-trait-that-contributes-to-your-growth-685ba34837cb

blog.usejournal.com

The single biggest trait that contributes to your growth.
Let's not beat around the bush, if you are here just to see the trait, let's get you in and out. But I would encourage you to read on and really understand how it contributes to growth. We are often...

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The starting point

The starting point

We are often excited at the idea of learning something new. We are excellent at identifying new skills and can visualize how they may change our life. 

But, we tend to overlook where we are starting from because a realistic starting point is hard on our pride.

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Pride stunts our growth

True humility allows you to plot Point A and accept that risk and failure are part of moving to Point B.

  • On the other hand, pride allows us to say we are beginners, but not to accept the process of learning that involves risk and failure. 
  • Then pride tries to protect our ego by convincing us that the price of possible failure is too great to achieve something new.

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Humility and growth

Humility brings growth. Pride is good at trying to convince us that we are not prideful.

Approach learning and growth with real humility. Accept that pride affects us all and will try to limit you. Failure is part of the process. Set aside your ego and simply move past the failure. Make adjustments, and continue the process anew.

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Dale Carnegie

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Dale Carnegie

Handling People

  • Don’t criticize, condemn or complain. People learn faster and retain knowledge more effectively when rewarded for good behavior than punished for bad behavior.
  • Give honest and sincere appreciation. The only way to get a person to do anything is by giving them what they want.
  • Arouse in the other person an eager want. The only way to influence other people is to talk about what they want and show them how to get it.

Appreciation and flattery

  • Flattery is selfish and insincere. It’s cheap praise. You tell the other person precisely what he thinks about himself.
  • Appreciation is unselfish and sincere. It happens when we stop thinking about ourselves and begin to think of the other person’s good points.

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Diffusing difficult situations

Diffusing difficult situations
  • Avoiding challenging conversations allows room for assumptions and continuing negative behavior.
  • Meet with the person to understand their concerns.
  • Listen

Your attitude is crucial

Regardless of whether you are right or wrong, your attitude will determine the outcome of any contentious experience. It’s incredibly important to have a peaceful state of mind before entering into a potential conflict situation.

Choose your words wisely

  • Stay away from starting sentences with “you." 
  • Hear the other person out first. Don’t apologize, but acknowledge that there is a problem. 
  • Ask questions for clarity, and be sure that you understand all the facts before you proceed with a resolution. 
  • If you need to clear the  a false accusation, do so concisely. You can say, “I would like to present information that may clear up this matter.”

Identify your passion

Everyday leadership begins with a passion and a mission. Ask yourself: “What am I passionate about? How can I turn that passion into a mission?”

Once you identify your pass...

Listen

Try listening more than you speak. Listen to experts and fellow enthusiasts, including those with whom you disagree. Absorb their perspectives, insights, and experiences.

From listening to others, we can gather valuable insights from both their successes and their failings.

You have a voice. Share it

But remember that using your voice as an everyday leader comes with a responsibility.

When sharing your opinion—in-person or via social media—be clear, be concise, and be constructive. That is the best way to be heard.