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Why You Need To Unplug Every 90 Minutes

https://www.fastcompany.com/3013188/why-you-need-to-unplug-every-90-minutes

fastcompany.com

Why You Need To Unplug Every 90 Minutes
Since sprints get us to focus in and finish our tasks with crisp consciousness, we know they're the most effective way of working. But what's fascinating is why they make us work so well. For Leo Widrich at Buffer, it's in human nature: while we often imagine ourselves as machines-which move linearly- we're actually organisms, which move cyclically.

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Work Cycles

Humans have imagined themselves as machines, doing work linearly, and continuously.

We aren't machines, but organisms that work best cyclically, with intervals and rest periods.

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90 Minute Cycles

The 90-minute cycle works well for most of the demanding and creative work, as follows:

  • Morning practice is essential.
  • Three sessions a day on an average
  • Each session is for 90 minutes
  • A break is essential between the sessions.

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The Ultradian Rhythm

The Ultradian Rhythm

Your brain can only focus for 90 to 120 minutes before it needs a break. 

This is the ultradian rhythm, a cycle that’s present in both our sleeping (the 90-minute cycles during which we progress through the five stages of sleep) and waking lives (as we move from higher to lower alertness).

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Unplug after 90 Minutes

Unplugging or taking a break after 90 minutes is not opposing your work in any way, but is a part of your work.

Taking a break only enhances your work quality, so that you are at your best after returning.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Breaks keep us from getting bored

The human brain just wasn’t built for the extended focus we ask of it these days.

The fix for this unfocused condition is simple—all we need is a brief interruption (aka a break) to ge...

Breaks and brain connections

Our brains have two modes:

  • focused mode, which we use when we’re doing things like learning something new, writing or working) and 
  • diffuse mode, which is our more relaxed, daydreamy mode when we’re not thinking so hard.

The mind solves its stickiest problems while daydreaming—something you may have experienced while driving or taking a shower.

Breaks help us reevaluate our goals

When you work on a task continuously, it’s easy to lose focus and get lost in the weeds. In contrast, following a brief intermission, picking up where you left off forces you to take a few seconds to think globally about what you’re ultimately trying to achieve. 

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There is no perfect method for everyone

There is no "one size fits all schedule" for maximum productivity.

Because we all have particular strengths and weaknesses when it comes to time management and productivity, what works...

The Time Blocking Method

It involves planning out your day in advance and dedicating specific hours to accomplish specific tasks. 

It’s important to block out both proactive blocks (when you focus on important tasks) and reactive blocks (when you allow time for requests and interruptions).

The Most Important Task Method (MIT)

Instead of writing a big to-do list and trying to get it all done, determine the 1-3 tasks that are absolutely essential and then focus on those tasks during the day. 

You don’t do anything else until you’ve completed the three essential tasks.

The Ultradian Rhythm

The Ultradian Rhythm

It is a biological cycle that lasts less than a day and happens in alternating periods of high and low frequencies of brain activity. Some researchers argue that it involves the ba...

Stop Ignoring Your Natural Cycles

The more you ignore your body's natural cycles the more it will trigger its responses towards stress, the fight-or-flight response. We then become less active in hearing out ideas, unable to respond rationally, remain hyper-vigilant and anxious.

So many workers are generally stressed out on a daily basis and although not all workplace environments are stressors, it is important that everyone gets to relax and recharge whenever then can to improve productivity and overall well-being.

Knowing When To Take A Break: Pay Attention To Your Body

When you start losing focus or are unable to concentrate on the littlest tasks, do these to recharge:

  • Take a 10-20 mins break, nap, or breather
  • Take up less demanding tasks
  • Walk around the office while listening to something that relaxes you
  • Wind down with a snack
  • Look away from the screen because your eyes need resting to