Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser - David Robson | Aeon Ideas - Deepstash

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Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser - David Robson | Aeon Ideas

https://aeon.co/ideas/why-speaking-to-yourself-in-the-third-person-makes-you-wiser

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Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser - David Robson | Aeon Ideas
We credit Socrates with the insight that 'the unexamined life is not worth living' and that to 'know thyself' is the path to true wisdom. But is there a right and a wrong way to go about such self-reflection? Simple rumination - the process of churning your concerns around in your head - isn't the answer.

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Worrying Constantly turns to Depression

We are generally advised to do self-reflection and examine our lives, but we may not be doing it right.

Rumination, the process of recurrent worrying or brooding, is the default process of the brain but can lead to impaired decision making and even depression.

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Third-Person Thinking

Third-person thinking, or talking to yourself about the problem as an outsider, or as a witness, can temporarily improve decision making, according to numerous studies.

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New-Found Wisdom

Talking to yourself in the third person brings clarity, insight and greater emotional regulation about the current situation or problem.

The detachment that being in the third-person offers, removes the inherent emotional bias that one has, but is unaware of.

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We Don't Know Happiness

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Collective Intelligence

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