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What is the amygdala?

https://www.livescience.com/amygdala.html

livescience.com

What is the amygdala?
The amygdala is often referred to as the fear center of the brain, but this description hardly does justice to the amygdala's complexity. Located deep in the brain's left and right temporal lobes, our two amygdalae are important for numerous aspects of thought, emotion and behavior, and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions.

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The Amygdala

The Amygdala
  • It's an area of the brain located deep in the left and right temporal lobes; it is known as the 'fear center', and has a complex set of functions.
  • The two amygdalae that we all have are important for numerous aspects of thought, emotion, and behaviour, and are associated with a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions.
  • The activity in our amygdalae is connected with fear conditioning, like our reaction to a negative stimulus, our minds state while staying vigilant, along with the emotional response to pain.
  • It also plays a role in shaping our behavioural reactions, especially aggression.

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The Amygdala and Psychiatric Disorders

Any kind of disruption in the functions of the amygdala in patients is associated with several anxiety disorders and phobias.

This includes post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolar disorder, alcohol, and drug abuse disorder.

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