The Amygdala and Psychiatric Disorders - Deepstash

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What is the amygdala?

The Amygdala and Psychiatric Disorders

Any kind of disruption in the functions of the amygdala in patients is associated with several anxiety disorders and phobias.

This includes post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolar disorder, alcohol, and drug abuse disorder.

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