The Amygdala - Deepstash

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What is the amygdala?

The Amygdala

The Amygdala
  • It's an area of the brain located deep in the left and right temporal lobes; it is known as the 'fear center', and has a complex set of functions.
  • The two amygdalae that we all have are important for numerous aspects of thought, emotion, and behaviour, and are associated with a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions.
  • The activity in our amygdalae is connected with fear conditioning, like our reaction to a negative stimulus, our minds state while staying vigilant, along with the emotional response to pain.
  • It also plays a role in shaping our behavioural reactions, especially aggression.

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