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A scientist's guide to life: How to sit correctly

https://www.sciencefocus.com/the-human-body/a-scientists-guide-to-life-how-to-sit-correctly/

sciencefocus.com

A scientist's guide to life: How to sit correctly
Stiff as a board or slouched like a sloth? Pull up a chair and take the weight off your feet as back pain researcher Dr Kieran O’Sullivan explains how to sit.

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There is no ‘right’ way to sit

There is no ‘right’ way to sit

When it comes to preventing aches and pains, there is no right way to sit.

  • It is a myth that sitting upright is good, and slouching is bad. There’s actually no evidence to support this.
  • Sitting up straight for a while becomes uncomfortable. We all realize this but are quick to suggest sitting upright is the best.
  • Sitting up straight is more socially acceptable than slouching.
  • Slouching and bad posture will not cause chronic back pain.
  • Genetics, anxiety, sleep patterns and stress play a role in poor posture.

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Find the best sitting position for you

Regular chair and desks versus ergonomic work stations do not make much of a difference. If they do work, it is because of novelty and usually short-lived.

  • If you are pain-free and sitting comfortably, you don't need to change.
  • If you experience a bit of pain, play around with your chair and find a better way to sit.
  • If you have persistent pain, try different chairs and find one that's right for you.

Instead of getting up and moving at prescribed intervals, people should just move more.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Get the Wii Fit

... to play games that require balancing and movement. 

Playing any games while standing up is also an alternative, as sitting all day is bad for us.

Test Your Posture

Test your back and neck posture against a wall or check proper posture illustrations to find any areas you need to work on when standing. 

Be more aware of your feet when you’re standing and adjust your weight so it’s distributed evenly across both feet.

Core Strengthening Exercises

Do pilates and other core strengthening exercises to help you stand taller and maintain a proper posture. 

Yoga also does that and emphasizes body awareness and balance.

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Aches and pains

Aches and pains

With the 2020 pandemic, many people are required to stay home.

If you're one of these people, you may be noticing new aches and pains you did not experience at the office.

Ergonomic furniture

Many companies follow an ANSI-HFS standard in the design of their computer workstations, which incorporates ergonomic furniture and accessories.

Most homes don't have the space to accommodate ergonomic office furniture, nor do most people invest in it. If you're working from home using your computer on a regular table or you sit in a lounge chair or on your bed, chances are you aren't in a healthy posture. It could potentially lead to musculoskeletal injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, or even deep vein thrombosis.

Your computer screen

View your computer screen with a straight neck. Put your screen in front of you at a comfortable viewing height. Don't look down at your screen or angle your screen, so you must twist your neck.

You may have to put the screen on a pile of books or on a cardboard box to raise it to a comfortable viewing position.

Your workspace matters

Your workspace matters

When you spend hours at your desk every day, even the smallest features of your workspace – such as the position of your monitor or the height of your chair– can greatly affect your productivity an...

Optimal Workspace Lighting

  • The best kind of light you can have in your office is natural light. It helps our bodies maintain our internal "clocks" or circadian rhythms which affects our sleep and energy.
  • Poor lighting, whether it's dim lighting or harsh lighting from overhead fluorescent lights, can cause eye strain, stress, and fatigue.
  • Don't sit with your back to a window unless you can shade it.
  • Don't sit facing a window because that will make reading a monitor difficult.
  • If you use a task lamp at your desk, position it so the bottom of the lampshade is at about the height of your chin when it's on.

Office Plants

  • Indoor plants prevent fatigue during attention-demanding work.
  • Even just having a window view of live greenery can be restorative and keep us focused.
  • A peace lily plant requires little sunlight to survive and you only have to water it when the soil is dried out and is also great for cleaning the air.
  • Cacti and aloe plants are other low-maintenance plants to consider.