A Matchmaker’s Advice on How to Make a Great First Impression at Work - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

A Matchmaker’s Advice on How to Make a Great First Impression at Work

https://hbr.org/2021/01/a-matchmakers-advice-on-how-to-make-a-great-first-impression-at-work

hbr.org

A Matchmaker’s Advice on How to Make a Great First Impression at Work
Five tips for virtual and IRL situations.

7

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

First Impressions

First Impressions

While trying to get hired, moving up the organization, or impressing clients, first impressions really become the last ones. However, many people who apparently make a great first impression on a date, meeting or party complain about being ‘ghosted’.

The devil is in the details here, as there are many small cues, the little things that create a lasting impression or make the other person create a negative impression of someone.

92 SAVES

431 READS

VIEW

Pre-Impressions

First impressions are now increasingly the Google/Facebook/Instagram search results. Our Linkedin profile, for instance, is a place hundreds of would-be recruiters make snap judgements, even before meeting us.

Their own preset notions and expectations cloud their decision, and our online profiles become the place where we have to be extremely careful.

96 SAVES

330 READS

Online Profiles: Do’s And Don’ts

  1. In your LinkedIn profile, add a slightly humorous line that makes you less of a larger-than-life person and more of a vulnerable human being.
  2. Your Profile Picture matters a lot, so you can conduct a test among your colleagues and acquaintances, giving them a few choices and asking for feedback.

104 SAVES

372 READS

Creative, Intriguing Conversations

A mundane, I’m Fine, Thank you! Isn’t going to be a great thing to say on a date, as it sounds superficial, artificial and robotic. A deep, interesting person will add something natural and creative to any conversation.

One can also start with a deeper question to form a real connection, like instead of asking the standard “How are you?”, one can say, “How are you, really?”

88 SAVES

304 READS

First Impressions: Don’t Be A Bore

Typical, standard interactions put anyone to sleep. It is good to be a ‘purple cow’, and stand out from the crowd. Even while being interviewed virtually, you can say something polite that stands out from the rest of the crowd saying the same old things.

While talking to colleagues, insert a fun joke in meeting invites, or have a little contest with a small prize. Just don’t be boring!

85 SAVES

281 READS

Your Likeability

  • A great first impression isn’t made by saying stuff, or by stating facts, or by answering each question impeccably. It is made by how you make the other person feel.
  • If you are interested in what they say and listen actively, they will start to form a connection, as they will feel good talking to you, even though they are doing most of the talking.
  • One can be genuinely interested and can ask an open-ended question, but don’t start to interrogate or start to brag.

90 SAVES

264 READS

Body Language

Most of us know that we should not frown or keep our arms crossed on a first date (or pick our nose, for that matter), but there are other things that help in non-verbal communication on a Zoom call:

  1. Lean forward by placing your elbow on your desk, showing that you are interested.
  2. Instead of looking at the screen, you can make eye-contact virtually by looking at the camera on your laptop.
  3. If looking at the camera is not intuitive, then you can stick a picture of someone who you are fond of, above the camera, and look into the eyes of that photograph.

92 SAVES

286 READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

First impressions

In less than one-tenth of a second of seeing someone for the first time, our brain processes information about the person’s face—which leads to quick conclusions about a new acquaintance’s quali...

Know your context

It’s important to first consider where you are trying to make a good impression—whether it’s a formal job interview or a dinner date. 

Context matters. It gives you cues as to how you should dress, speak, look and behave, in a way that matches the setting you are entering to. That is a key aspects of making a good impression. 

Adjust your attitude

Try not to look bored, rude or hostile.

A useful attitude is welcoming, curious and enthusiastic: smile, make eye contact long enough to notice the color of that person’s eyes, sit without crossing your arms or legs. This project a positive, open warm impression.

4 more ideas

The first impression

The first impression

First impressions are like invisible tattoos we imagine for each and every person we meet. While it is possible to change a first impression, it is very difficult to succeed doing this.

Tips to make a good first impression

In order to make a good first impression, you should consider checking out the below tips:

  • suitable eye contact: it is a sign of self-confidence. However, do not exaggerate with the duration
  • handshake: a good handshake is at the same time firm, warm and dry
  • the proper voice: your voice should make proof of self-confidence as well
  • dress similarly to the other person: this way, you will give the impression of familiarity and equal terms
  • appreciate cleanliness: your face and your home should always be sparkling clean
  • find the appropriate posture: relaxed and open postures are preferred to make a good impression.

Our Image In A Professional Setting

Our Image In A Professional Setting

In a professional setting, our identity is largely governed by the perception of our peers, colleagues and bosses,

Our ‘image’ depends on how they measure the impact of our behaviour and ac...

Our Digital Image

People who want to hire us, invest in our companies or collaborate with us increasingly look at our digital footprints on LinkedIn, Facebook, Google and Twitter to ‘profile’ us.

As we go more and more online, the way we are perceived digitally, in our display pictures, zoom videos, emails and social media provides a mountain of data for humans, and machines to make judgements about our personal and professional attributes.

Working With The Algorithm

As companies and individuals access our digital avatars and make their judgements, we have the ability to curate them and tell them a story that we want them to hear.

We need to understand the algorithms that are formulated to identify signals and patterns, and ‘hack’ them to our advantage.