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The Psychology of Excitement: How to Better Engage Your Audience

https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/psychology-of-excitement

blog.hubspot.com

The Psychology of Excitement: How to Better Engage Your Audience
Understanding psychology is a crucial part of being a successful marketer. What I've discovered is that the most powerful advances in content marketing don't come from "hacks," "tricks," or "techniques," but from science-backed psychology. One of the most powerful and interesting areas of psychology deals with excitement.

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How Excitement Works

How Excitement Works

Excitement is temporary

It could go on for only so long due to a condition of stability in the body.

Excitement is mental, but it...

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Great Marketing Excites Your Audience

Great Marketing Excites Your Audience

Strong Emotion. Create shareable, viral content that is relatable to the the audience.

Progress. Reward people who always patronize your service or product to make them always g...

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The Psychology Of Color: Research Findings

The Psychology Of Color: Research Findings
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The Psychology Of Color - Misconceptions

Elements such as personal preference, experiences, upbringing, cultural differences, context, etc., often muddy the effect individual colors have on us. So assertions on the effect of colors are often not based on scientifically sound evidence.

A Psychologically Rich Life

A Psychologically Rich Life

The definition of a good life has been divided into two main conceptualizations by many great philosophers and thinkers.

  • A Happy Life or hedonic well-being involves pleasure, positivity and enjoyment.
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It is a life full of intense, deep emotions, complex and diverse mental engagements, and surprising experiences, making the psychologically rich life both pleasant, meaningful and novel. This may or may not involve any kind of economic richness.

When Perfect Becomes Boring

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The cracks start to show after a few years in the form of mid-life crisis or family issues like marital problems.

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The Effects Of Burnout

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What Makes a Job Satisfying

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