"Sisu"

"Sisu"

Etymologically, it comes from a Finnish root word that implies “inner” or “inside.” In Finnish culture, it’s about adopting the attitude of persistence and determination.

It’s often described as stoic determination, the tenacity of purpose, grit, and resilience.

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Benjamin Franklin
“Happiness consists more in small conveniences or pleasures that occur every day, than in great pieces of good fortune that happen but seldom.”
The happiest countries
Finland, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, and Sweden are ranked among the top happiest places in the world. 

Their population enjoys a healthy work-life balance, high standards of living with less pressure, less stress, and more time for everything they enjoy and love doing.

"Lagom"

It's part of the Swedish culture. It means “Not too little. Not too much. Just right.

The concept encourages an overarching balance across our lives: everything in moderation.

"Hygge"

In both Danish and Norwegian, 'hygge' means “to give courage, comfort, joy”.

In Denmark, 'hygge' is a central part of the culture. It’s about giving your responsible, stressed-out self a break to live in the moment and enjoy your immediate environment.

"Lykke"

This is the Danish word for “happiness.” 

The concept teaches that happiness isn’t a destination, it’s a habit. It’s what we do to make everything else in life awesome.

No people can be truly happy if they do not feel that they are choosing the course of their own life.

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Prioritise a work-life balance

The Danes have better work-life balance than anywhere else in the world, with only 2 per cent regularly working long hours (compared to an average figure of 13 per cent for other countries). 

All employees are entitled to a minimum of five weeks paid holiday a year, and when Danes are at work, they often have flexible working environments. 

5

IDEAS

  • In the 1930s, artists, inspired by the concepts of Constructivism, Functionalism, and Surrealism, paved the way for Nordic design's iconic milestones.
  • In the 1950s, the Lunning Prize (an equivalent of Nobel Prize) hailed exemplary designers who have given valuable contributions to Nordic Design from 1951 to 1970.
  • In 1954, a traveling exhibition comprised of the region's best designs landed in the United States and Canada and influenced the American culture.
  • In Denmark, Danish design thrived during the 1940s to the 1960s and created its own flavor, abandoning grandeur ornamentation in pursuit of form and function.
  • After WWII, Danish design has become a democratic movement, where makers turn to mass-producing natural raw materials such as ceramics, wood, and leather.
  • While the popularity declined in the 1970s, it had an upturn a decade later.
If you aren’t growing, you are dying
Happiness that is true and lasting is quite simply this: progress. Progress = Happiness! If you are moving forward in your life, if you are progressing personally, professionally, emotionally, spiritually — you will be happy. It is only in stagnation that we wilt.

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