Stepping into a Leadership Role? Be Ready to Tell Your Story. - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Stepping into a Leadership Role? Be Ready to Tell Your Story.

https://hbr.org/2020/04/stepping-into-a-leadership-role-be-ready-to-tell-your-story

hbr.org

Stepping into a Leadership Role? Be Ready to Tell Your Story.
Hit the ground running with a thoughtful personal pitch.

3

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

How employees perceive leaders

How employees perceive leaders

Recent surveys have shown that employees can be grouped in two main categories, according to their perception of a new leader:

  • Warriors: they evaluate your knowledge, know-how and if you are really able to help them
  • Worriers: they focus on the leadership approach that the new leader has designed for the company.

When taking over a management position, planning your transition as well as paying attention to the way you behave with the others are aspects that need to be taken into account.

169 SAVES

513 READS

VIEW

Become more relatable as a new leader

Relationships with supervisors can be powerful motivators.

Enough personal information as to make yourself seem more relatable provided at an appropriate time might just be the key to a future successful career.

145 SAVES

414 READS

Make your leadership story successful

Introducing yourself as the new leader of a team can be pretty challenging, as people will want to know more about yourself as well as about your plans in regards to the future of the company.

Explain patiently why you chose this path and how you plan on improving the chosen department. Employees also appreciate it when you explain why your new position is integral to your story and, most important, how your direct reports play a critical role in that story.

151 SAVES

372 READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Fresher: Looking For Credibility Without Experience

The Fresher: Looking For Credibility Without Experience

The credibility paradox haunts many freshers entering the workforce, who have to show they have credibility and expertise in a field without having the benefit of prior work experience.

Th...

How To Overcome The Credibility Paradox: Research

Get familiar with industry-specific knowledge, upcoming trends and information, while trying to attain mastery in an area you think you have an edge on.

There are plenty of resources available digitally for a thorough research.

Gaining Experience Through Volunteering

Working on projects as an intern or an unpaid volunteer provides us with the hands-on knowledge we need to jumpstart our careers.

Volunteering for projects provides us with new opportunities to learn and grow, while building our network.

3 more ideas

Stories create “sticky” memories

...by attaching emotions to things that happen. That means those who can create and share good stories have a powerful advantage over others.

Facts and figures and all the rational thi...

Start with a message

First, settle on your ultimate message; then you can figure out the best way to illustrate it.

Every storytelling exercise should begin by asking: Who is my audience and what is the message I want to share with them? 

Each decision about your story should flow from those questions. 

Use personal experiences

The best storytellers look to their own memories and life experiences for ways to illustrate their message. 

Think of a moment in which your own failures led to success in your career or a lesson that a parent or mentor imparted.

There may be a tendency not to want to share personal details at work, but anecdotes that illustrate struggle, failure, and barriers overcome are what make leaders appear authentic and accessible.

Telling our origin story

Telling our origin story

Stories of origin come in many forms - how we became part of an organization, or how we emerged as a new person after a crisis.

However, we seldom examine what we include a...

Leadership origin stories

Research found four dominant themes of origin stories among leaders: being, engaging, performing, and accepting.

These themes act as lenses, contributing to how leaders see themselves.

The "being" leadership story

Leaders who use this lens always thought of themselves as leaders. They admit to having a natural call to leadership that started in childhood.

In current leadership, people who use this lens often note personal qualities such as confidence, optimism, and natural leadership styles.