Habits That Will Leave You Emotionally Exhausted - Deepstash

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Habits That Will Leave You Emotionally Exhausted

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/smashing-the-brainblocks/201909/3-habits-will-leave-you-emotionally-exhausted?collection=1145253

psychologytoday.com

Habits That Will Leave You Emotionally Exhausted
Are these thinking habits affecting your emotional health?

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Emotional weight

Emotional weight

There are certain foods that, when we eat too much of it, will bring health consequences. Similar to how eating certain foods can affect our physical wellness, thinking in specific ways can also have long-term effects on our emotional wellness. We could gain emotional weight, and it can become as tough to lose as body weight.

Emotional weight could consist of a mix of worry, stress, and disappointments. It can restrict our physical activity and make it difficult to feel joy and appreciation, to be open and accessible, and be motivated and engaged. Some common practices can add to our emotional weight and hurt our emotional wellness.

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Setting unrealistic expectations

Expectations are our idea of how we think the world should look. This may involve how we should feel, what we should have achieved, and how other people should be treating us.

We could set up expectations that are too high based on arbitrary rules and then become frustrated when we can't meet it.A good rule of thumb is if we are not working diligently toward something, or there is no proof for what we expect, then it may be unrealistic.

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Making unfair comparisons

There are advantages to social comparisons, like ensuring that we are reaching certain developmental milestones. But unfair comparisons can cause you to feel inadequate and incompetent.

Online social networks provide a platform for social comparisons. It is important to question the purpose of this kind of contrast. How will comparing yourself to others affect you?

To avoid undervaluing your well-being, make social comparisons that are purposeful and fair.

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Overcommitting

Some of us are prone to take on more responsibilities than we can handle. We sign up for more at work, volunteer, and fill our schedules with more activities. We overcommit.

Taking on more responsibilities reduces the chance that any job will get done really well. Not taking on all the opportunities that you encounter may drive you to the fear of missing out (FOMO).

Focus on finding a balance between doing too much and doing too little. It may take time to find a balance, but it will offset the emotional weight added by the stress of doing too much.

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Burnout At The Workplace

Burnout At The Workplace

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Self-Sabotage Traps

Some people appear immune to workplace burnout, due to their having a different response towards stress. Many of these burnout ‘survivors’ are actually getting into various self-sabotage traps. These traps can be handled by two important emotional intelligence skills:

  1. Self-awareness, that makes us look closely at our defensive reflex actions.
  2. Self-management, that makes us change our habits, steering away from destructive behaviour.

Self-Sabotage Trap: Extreme Adaptability

Many people overextend themselves, bending over backwards to please others. They say ‘yes’ to most requests at the workplace and sacrifice their own well-being, energy and personal time to try to appear flexible and adaptable to their peers and bosses.

To break this trap, try to say ‘no’ often, or take low-stake projects. You can also set boundaries and take time off to recharge yourself.

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Social Comparison Theory

Psychology Today describes social comparison theory as, "... determining our own social and personal self-worth based on how we stack up against others we perceive as somehow faring better or worse...

What Others Think of Us

As a human being interacting with other human beings, we learn that how we show up in the world seems to matter. 

If we have learned through our own social experiences that certain patterns of behavior, such as being extraordinarily busy and constantly on-the-go lead to being successful, connected and accepted by others, then we may find it appealing to engage in those behaviors.

Busy vs. Productive

Merriam-Webster defines the word productive as, "Yielding results, benefits or profits." Essentially, it means that we have something to show for our hard work. 

Being busy has to do with an amount of time, where productivity has more to do with our use of time.

Anchoring Bias

A common occurrence of heuristics in which we use an initial starting point as an anchor that is then adjusted to yield a final estimate or value.

Example: estimating the value of an o...

Being Too Optimistic

People who are told that the risk of something bad happening is lower than they expected, tend to adjust their predictions to match the new information. But they ignore the new information when the risk is higher.

Part of this overly optimistic outlook stems from our natural tendency to believe that bad things happen to other people, but not to us. 

You Often Make Poor Comparisons

Sometimes we make poor comparisons or the compared items are not representative or equal.

We often decide based on rapid comparisons without really thinking about our options. In order to avoid bad decisions, relying on logic and thoughtful examination of the options can sometimes be more important than relying on your immediate "gut reaction."