5 Timeless Productivity Lessons from Artists and Entrepreneurs - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

5 Timeless Productivity Lessons from Artists and Entrepreneurs

https://www.outsideonline.com/2234366/5-productivity-lessons-artists-and-entrepreneurs

outsideonline.com

5 Timeless Productivity Lessons from Artists and Entrepreneurs
Training to maximize your fitness potential requires discipline, sacrifice, and enduring drive. Though building up your body and mind to tackle athletic challenges may seem like a unique endeavor, it turns out that's not the case. Performance is performance, and there are many parallels between training for a marathon, making great art, and building a business that lasts.

5

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Consistency Over Heroic Efforts

Though inspiration can suddenly strike, turning it into a tangible finished product is a matter of sustained effort. It’s getting up every day and doing the work.

The best people in their field are the best not because of a few massive efforts, but because of consistency over a long duration.

847 SAVES


VIEW

Seek Mentorship

We all need to grow, learn, and take risks. Having a mentor or coach makes this massively easier.

Additionally, a good mentor helps you avoid making the same mistakes they have

448 SAVES


Sleep

Sleep is not just about rest. It’s the period where the mind is shut off and reset. 

When we sacrifice sleep, we also sacrifice creativity, self-control, and attention span. When sleep is lacking, so is self-control.

559 SAVES


Put Yourself in Good Company

Seek out people who know things you don’t and try to learn from them.

Surround yourself with positive, honest, smart, and diverse people who bring new perspectives and are not afraid to challenge you. 

500 SAVES


Focus on What You Can Control

Worrying about the result is a distraction from what you really should be thinking about: how you can respond, and what happens next.

Your work leaves your hands at some point and what happens next is almost always out of your control. People either like your work of art or they don’t. 

591 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Stick With The Plan

Stick With The Plan

Most training plans become hard, and difficult to stick to after a while.

Some sure-fire tips to stick to a rough and tough training plan, sailing through the low-motivation days:

  • ...

Picking Something Fun

You are more likely to keep doing an activity that you enjoy.

It shouldn't be a daily fight against yourself. Being consistent needs doing what you like doing, not something that you find miserable. Avoid physical or mental burnout.

Showing Up

To change your mental state, you need to change your physical state. Your mood changes based on the action you are performing.

Action is the biggest motivation. Show up and get started, and the rest is easy.

3 more ideas

Managing Letdowns

Every athlete is bound to face at least a few major letdowns in his or her career. When this happens, you want to let yourself feel down for a good 24 to 48 hours. 

But afte...

Dealing With Uncertainty

  • Prevent it: Do what you can to minimize uncertainty by training like you want to race. 
  • Manage it: Develop a mantra or automatic actions to fall back when uncertainty strikes. 
  • Grow from it: View uncertainty as an opportunity to grow. Welcome it on the path to personal growth.

Turning Anxiety into Excitement

Pre-race nerves are common, even amongst professional athletes. 

Reframe nerves as excitement. When we do this, we harness heightened perception to raise ourselves up. 

Instead of telling yourself, “I’m anxious, I need to calm down,” tell yourself, “I am excited, my body is primed to perform.

Higher cognitive performance

Our brain can change throughout our lifetime, in relation to factors like behavior, process, and environment. It means we can still improve ourselves with strategic and incremental changes to our d...

Find your internal rhythms

To improve your mental ability, you have to understand its natural peaks and drops throughout the day. It can be different for every person, so pay attention to what time of the day your mind is functioning at its best.

If you find it difficult to see what time of day your mind is functioning best, keep a productivity log. At two-hour intervals, write down your physical and mental status. You'll find a pattern of peak performance or sluggishness.

Multitasking is a myth

Most people have little pockets of time throughout the day, between meetings and calls and emails, with 15 minutes here, and 30 minutes there. To perform at your best depends on simple time management hacks.

  • Set aside one or two times a day to check and respond to all your messages and emails, then close your inbox.
  • Try and structure your day in one-to two-hour chunks of focused work.
  • Introduce a clear protocol for colleagues to contact one another in case of an actual emergency.