Change leader, change thyself - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Change leader, change thyself

https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/leadership/change-leader-change-thyself

mckinsey.com

Change leader, change thyself
Leo Tolstoy, the Russian novelist, famously wrote, "Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." Tolstoy's dictum is a useful starting point for any executive engaged in organizational change. After years of collaborating in efforts to advance the practice of leadership and cultural transformation, we've become convinced that organizational change is inseparable from individual change.

12

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Leo Tolstoy

268 SAVES

444 READS


VIEW

About change

Organizations don’t change. People change. Many companies move to change systems and structures and create new policies and processes but fail to address the underlying mind-sets and capabilities of the people who will execute it.

A new strategy will fall short of its potential if they fail to address the mental attitude because people on the ground tend to continue to behave as they did before.

180 SAVES

238 READS


Looking both ways

Companies that only look outward in the process of organizational change, and dismiss individual learning and adaptation make two common mistakes:

  • They focus solely on business outcomes and fail to appreciate that people will have to adapt to implement it.
  • They focus too much on developing skills. 

151 SAVES

190 READS


The meaning of looking inward

Individuals have their own beliefs, priorities, values, and fears that influence how they respond to different actions. Looking inward is then a way to examine your own modes of operating to learn what makes you behave in a certain way.

Those who seek to lead effectively should look at their internal experiences because it will direct how they take action, whether they are aware of it or not.

170 SAVES

184 READS


Looking inward

Looking inward

There are two dimensions of looking inward that lead to self-understanding.

  1. Profile awareness. It is the recognition of habits of thought, emotions, hopes, and behavior in various circumstances and the impact they have on others.
  2. State awareness. It is the recognition of what's driving you at the moment you take action.

170 SAVES

208 READS


State awareness 

State awareness is more than just "a state of mind." It involves the perception of a wide range of inner experiences in the present moment and the impact on your behavior.

Many senior executives know that they show negative behavior under pressure, but are not aware that they continue that behavior until well after they've started to do so.

139 SAVES

161 READS


The performance gap

Learning to look inward in the process of organizational transformation helps individuals to align what they intend with what they actually say and do, to influence others. This is known as the performance gap.

This kind of learning awakens the full leader within you. It expands your capacity to lead human change and deliver a real impact.

146 SAVES

148 READS


Closing the gaps

It is not enough to use various assessment tools, because we all possess the full range of qualities these assessments identify to varying degrees. You need a more nuanced approach that recognizes your inner complexity. Some questions would include:

  • What are the main parts of your profile, and how are they balanced against each other?
  • What resources and capabilities does each part of my profile possess? 
  • When do I tend to call on each member of my inner executive team? 
  • Do I draw on all of the inner sources of power available to me, or do I favor one or two most of the time?

143 SAVES

141 READS


Profile awareness

Map the Big Four. The Big Four can be thought of as an internal leadership team that occupies an internal executive suite:

  1. the chief executive officer (CEO), or inspirational Dreamer; 
  2. the chief financial officer (CFO), or analytical Thinker; 
  3. the chief people officer (CPO), or emotional Lover;  
  4. the chief operating officer (COO), or practical Warrior to move into action.

Your ability to use the right inner executive at the right time for the right purpose will make you able to harness its specific strengths and skills to meet a situation.

165 SAVES

173 READS


Develop state awareness

People who fail to notice when they are becoming annoyed, judgmental, or defensive in the moment are not choosing how to behave. We all need an inner "lookout."

It is critical during a period of organizational change that the senior executives collectively adopt the lookout role for the organization as a whole to allow for more effective leadership behavior. 

133 SAVES

129 READS


Awareness and organizational change

Translate awareness into organizational change. Those open eyes will be better able to spot obstacles to organizational change.

For instance, a company becomes aware that the absence of coaching is stifling progress. When looking deeper, it is established that there is a negative bias towards coaching that prevents the use of it. Changing the prevalent element of corporate culture will ultimately lead to moving toward achieving its goals.

129 SAVES

111 READS


One change catalyst

While dealing with resistance and fear is often necessary, it’s rarely enough to take an organization to the next level. Organizations must unlock the full potential of individuals.

It starts with learning to lead yourself. It is best done by questioning some core assumptions about yourself and the way things work. Allow the lessons learned to cascade through the organization.

134 SAVES

151 READS


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Pressure Of Time

Most leaders have familiar approaches to managing time: setting goals, planning, delegating, tracking commitments, and creating to-do lists. While these approaches do help in self-organization, the...

Sustainable Productivity

Instead of increasing the number of productive hours, we can focus on getting the right things done in a timely way. We also need to restore and balance ourselves, our colleagues, family and environment, instead of a neurotic or pathological focus on deadlines.

Find out what's truly important to us and use the finite resource of time wisely.

Phantom Workload

Phantom workload looks like real work but results in massive unproductivity and even conflict in an organization. The pressure to meet unrealistic expectations causes a vicious cycle of further workload.

Leaders need to take a hard look at what is being avoided or not addressed. Facing difficult tasks that were 'swept under the carpet' earlier strengthens them further to make hard decisions and face difficult people and situations.

6 more ideas

Inspiration alone is not enough

Inspiration alone is not enough

Just as leaders who deliver only performance may do so at a cost that the organization is unwilling to bear, those who focus only on inspiration may find that they motivate the masses but a...

Inspiring leaders

The leaders that inspire are those who use a personal combination of strengths to motivate individuals and teams to take on bold missions and to hold them accountable for results.

And they unlock higher performance through empowerment, not thorough command and control.

Becoming an Inspiring Leader

  • You only need centeredness: a state of mindfulness that enables leaders to remain calm under stress, empathize, listen deeply, and remain present.
  • Your key strength has to match how your organization creates value.
  • You have to behave differently if you want your employees to do so.

Agile leadership

Focuses on fast decision making, short-term goals, and the empowerment of individuals

And it has expanded to include general leadership skills like acting on a shared vision, le...

The 2 elements of the servant leadership

  • Vision: Creating a shared vision is the leadership part of servant leadership;
  • Implementation: Helping people implement that vision is the servant part of servant leadership.

Agile leaders are servant leaders.

Situational Leadership® II (SLII®)

It's a servant leadership model taught by The Ken Blanchard Companies, based on the belief that leadership style should be tailored to the situation

This kind of flexibility is a key principle of agile organizations.