Most People Think This Is A Smart Habit, But It's Actually Brain-Damaging - Deepstash

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Most People Think This Is A Smart Habit, But It's Actually Brain-Damaging

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Most People Think This Is A Smart Habit, But It's Actually Brain-Damaging
This is the mental equivalent of eating McDonald’s every day.

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Bad learning = brain damage

Bad learning = brain damage

A knock on the head isn’t the only way to “impair” our brains. Brain damage can be caused by anything that physically changes our brains in a way that makes us less intelligent or functional. Like a lot of self-learning: news or superficial articles that confirm our biases. 

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Our 🧠 physically changes when we learn

Our 🧠 physically changes when we learn

Researchers found that certain parts of the brain of London taxi drivers who completed the training process were significantly larger than aspiring drivers who dropped out of the training program. 

This shows that the training program was the cause of the growth. 🤯

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Assuming that all learning is inherently good

Assuming that all learning is inherently good
Just like eating McDonald’s doesn’t make us healthier, “junk” or “fake” learning doesn’t make us smarter. In fact, this kind of learning actually makes us dumber.

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How Learning Works

How Learning Works
Learning is a circular process: 
  1. Taking in information, 
  2. Reasoning with that information
  3. Experimenting in the real world, 
  4. Getting feedback ...

... and then taking what learn to go through the cycle again. 

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Junk learning is like a disease

Junk learning is like a disease

Each new thing we learn is like adding a new brick to a building and then cementing it to other bricks to create a knowledge structure.  

When we’re collecting bad ideas, we are adding shoddy bricks on a poor foundation. Our reasoning is going to be bad and we will suffer. 

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Alvin Toffler
“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” 

Alvin Toffler

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When it comes to knowledge, think like an investor

When it comes to knowledge, think like an investor

Most information out there will be outdated in months, and it will be a bad strategy to base your knowledge on easily perishable blocks. 

The strategy here is to consume information that has passed the test of time. A classic book will be more valuable than the latest New York Times №1 bestseller. Don't consume, invest. 

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Dunning - Kruger Effect

Dunning - Kruger Effect

In learning any new domain, our confidence is actually highest when we start. Dunning and Kruger found that when we don’t know what we don’t know, we overestimate our abilities. 

As philosopher Bertrand Russell famously put it: “The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.”

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Confirmation Bias is not Learning

Confirmation Bias is not Learning

When we only hear opinions that confirm our beliefs, our learning is incremental at best. Like our social media bubble: We read the same sites, listen to the same friends (who agree with us!), and watch the same news over and over, which only confirms what we already believe.

We learn the most by proving ourselves wrong, not by proving ourselves right. 

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Assimilate or Accommodate

Assimilate or Accommodate

When we are exposed to new information, we adapt to it in one of two ways:  

  1. Assimilation — We use our existing base of knowledge to understand a new object or situation.  
  2. Accommodation — We realize that our existing base of knowledge does not work & we change it to deal with a new situation.

Jean Piaget, one of the greatest psychologists, showed that we grow our knowledge when we transform our thinking to be able to accommodate external knowledge that doesn’t fit. 

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The Halo Effect

The Halo Effect

It's a cognitive bias that makes us trust a person’s advice in one area of life simply because they are an expert in another area.

It’s like buying a Lincoln car because Matthew McConaughey drives one in a Superbowl ad. Or listening to a famous painter giving her grand plan for re-engineering society.

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Over-specialization can limit us

Over-specialization can limit us

Being too specialized can hurt future learning if done alone. Supplement by spending more of your time learning fundamental knowledge that doesn’t change. 

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The 30-Day Rule

The 30-Day Rule

One can develop healthy spending habits and avoid wasting money by using the simple 30-day rule: Whenever there is an urge to spend on something, just wait for 30 days.

One can buy...

The Emotional Component of A Purchase

  • Marketers capitalize on the emotional component of any purchase while working hard towards ensuring consumers make ‘impulse’ purchases both online and offline.
  • Many people purchase due to their need for emotional fulfilment, indulging in shopping therapy and incurring credit card debt.
  • This leads to random, unused stuff lying in the house, which is not really needed.

When Everything Is On Sale

Most stores use the ‘SALE’ marketing gimmick (both online and offline) so that we can splurge our money now, instead of waiting.

The system is gamed for us to spend our money wherever we go. We need to stop wondering where our money went and start telling it where to go.

2 more ideas

Defining difficult people

Defining difficult people

We are social creatures who desire validation. We feel good when others share our belief system. But we feel dejected when others do not value our inputs, crush our ideas, or ignore what we have to...

Influences that define difficult people

We view the world and the people in it from a specific paradigm.

How we relate to someone is driven by our personality, expectations, background, and experience. Why we find someone difficult is then a very personal affair.

The TRICK framework that drives us

  • T - Tagging. We are quick to label others as needy, manipulative, fake, arrogant, but explain away our own selfish acts and believe we are better than others.
  • R - Righteous. When we find someone difficult, we start believing in the righteousness of how we feel, what we want, and why the other person deserves to be treated in a certain way. We reject them as a person, as well as their ideas.
  • I - Intention. Once we know we are right, it's easy to assume they act out of bad intent.
  • C - Confirmation. Once we think someone is difficult, every interaction serves as a validation of our beliefs. We will reject the evidence that contradicts our beliefs and seek information that strengthens our views.
  • K - Keenness to fix others. Without changing our own behavior, we assume the other person is at fault and then desire to fix them.

Love at first sight is based on imagination

Love at first sight is based on imagination

Most people understand love at first sight to be falling in love with a stranger when they see them for the first time. But love at first sight is based on stereotypes, imagination, and ass...

What makes a stranger stand out to you

If you have experienced love at first sight, think what made the stranger stand out to you.

  • Did the person resemble someone you had a relationship with before?
  • Did the person cause you to feel nostalgic about an old friend? If so, that "love" may have been only a subconscious connection, where your brain remembered a positive impact of a previous relationship.

Our subconscious mind connects facial features with characteristics

Knowing this, you may understand why some are certain about the possibility of love at first sight.

But it doesn't make the potential resulting breakup easier. It leaves us feeling like we lost something destiny had intended.