Our Response To Stress
  • When we experience a stressful event, different hormones like adrenaline and cortisol are released inside our body, resulting in a fight-or-flight response, and may experience volatility, extreme emotions and brain shutdowns.
  • Long-term stress has been linked with all kinds of problems related to physical and mental health.
  • Our community, the support we get from family, friends and relatives tend to factor in our response towards a stressful situation.

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Why People Cope with Life Events So Differently

healthline.com

Mature adults have developed their coping skills and are not as reactive and stressful all the time as the young population, which are yet to understand steadfastness, resilience or the benefits of a calm mind.

When a person has successfully managed challenging situations, new problems are not reacted with panic as our past experiences give us strength and self-efficacy.

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Right action comes when we take proactive steps to remedy a problematic situation, tapping into the things that are possible and can be controlled.

  • A person with an external locus of control blames others and acts like a hopeless victim.
  • A person who has an internal locus of control is able to move into positive action and cope up with the situation at hand.

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A person with underlying and invisible mental health issues is likely to get triggered by any event.

Like the straw that broke a camel’s back, a person’s current mindset and problems can project a new problem in a distorted way, making even a small event feel overwhelming. This leads to feelings of inadequacy and low self-esteem.

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Our personality and upbringing play a major role in how we handle a stressful situation.

First responders, firefighters and surgeons have different skill sets and mental strength, apart from the professional training that they have undergone, leading to better handling of pressure situations.

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  1. Take care of yourself by practising mindfulness meditation, yoga, or deep breathing.
  2. Focus on what you are able to control, and regulate it, like watching less news.
  3. Ask for support from family or a therapist.
  4. Help others and listen to their problems, creating a reciprocating feeling of empathy and understanding.
  5. Understand that we are all different yet the same, and learn to live in harmony.

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