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How to stop catastrophising - an expert's guide

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/dec/29/stop-catastrophising-expert-guide-psychologist

theguardian.com

How to stop catastrophising - an expert's guide
A clinical psychologist suggests a three-pronged plan for tackling anxiety and approaching each day logically and positively

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Catastrophisers

Catastrophisers

They tend to be fairly anxious people and on hearing uncertain news, they imagine the worst possible outcome. If a catastrophiser is told something inconclusive, they look for a way to feel in control again immediately. They learn to choose the worst possible outcome because it allows for the greatest sense of relief when they are reassured.

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External seeking behaviour

External seeking behaviour

Catastrophisers rush to external sources to calm themselves down: matching symptoms online to obtain a diagnosis and treatment options; asking a professional to tell them that they will survive etc. Once they are reassured, they feel better – in psychological jargon, they have “rewarded” this seeking behaviour.

But this way to alleviate anxiety offers only temporary relief. 

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How to stop catastrophising

How to stop catastrophising
  • Look for enjoyable ways to challenge yourself and use your energy more positively;
  • Take control. Establish a regular “worry time”;
  • Ask yourself what you would advise your best friend to do about each concern, and take that action;
  • Learn to self-soothe. 

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