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3 Science-Backed Ways to Boost Your Motivation (Even When You Don't Feel Like Working)

Motivation and creative work

Intrinsic motivation is necessary for creative work. We need broad thinking, so we can come up with innovative ideas and see new connections.

Extrinsic motivation narrows our thinking by focusing on getting the task done so we can earn the reward. It's providing you an external incentive to work hard.

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3 Science-Backed Ways to Boost Your Motivation (Even When You Don't Feel Like Working)

3 Science-Backed Ways to Boost Your Motivation (Even When You Don't Feel Like Working)

https://zapier.com/blog/stay-motivated-at-work/

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Key Ideas

Motivation and creative work

Intrinsic motivation is necessary for creative work. We need broad thinking, so we can come up with innovative ideas and see new connections.

Extrinsic motivation narrows our thinking by focusing on getting the task done so we can earn the reward. It's providing you an external incentive to work hard.

Elements of intrinsic motivation

The 3 elements required for intrinsic motivation:

  • Autonomy: it's about choice - when you believe you have a choice, you're more motivated.
  • Mastery: it's about wanting to get better at something that matters.
  • Purpose: it comes from believing you're working on something that's bigger than yourself.

Knowing our work helps others

When we know that our work will make a difference to someone else, it makes us work harder. 

Try to reach out to the people who directly benefit from your work. This could boost your motivation to work hard.

Be aware of loss aversion

Loss aversion refers to the fact that we feel stronger emotions about losing something than we do about gaining the same thing.

For example: If you found $20 on the ground, you'd be pretty happy. But if you had $20 in your wallet and lost it, you'd be really unhappy.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Two types of motivation

Motivation is categorized into two basic types: Extrinsic and intrinsic.

  • Extrinsic motivation is related to external forces like money or fame.
  • Intrinsic motivation

Money as a motivation

Money as a tool for motivation is limiting at best, and the 'carrot and stick' approach many managers use to motivate employees is will actually achieve the opposite effect of what was intended.

Conditional rewards

‘If, then’ rewards or conditional rewards are when we promise to give something to an individual when they complete a certain task.

These rewards can have a negative impact on motivation as the employees lose the will to work on that task for the sake of working.

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The Motivation Decline

Having a high paying job that is going well and getting better does not mean that you will always be motivated to go to work each morning.

Your motivation can start to decrease despite promot...

Finding New Motivation

Consider these questions: 

  • "What kind of work would you and consider satisfactory if you had to do it until you're 80?"
  • "What would make you feel excited to wake up every day for the next 45 years that could also earn you enough money to cover your expenses?"

Two types of drivers

  • Extrinsic motivatorsThis is what you do because you have to pay the bills or want to buy a new car. This type of motivation doesn't last. When you hit your goal, you might feel good for a week, but then it wears off quickly.
  • Intrinsic motivatorsThis is what drives you to do things when there isn't a carrot or stick. For instance, hobbies are driven by this. This kind of motivator does no wear off.

The Zeigarnik Effect

Unfinished work continues to exert an influence, even when we try to move on to other things.

When you start working on something but do not finish it, thoughts of the unfinished work ...

The Zeigarnik effect and memory

It reveals a great deal about how memory works. Zeigarnik suggested that failing to complete a task creates underlying cognitive tension. This results in greater mental effort and rehearsal in order to keep the task at the forefront of awareness. Once completed, the mind is then able to let go of these efforts.

You can even use this psychological phenomenon to your advantage.

Get More Out of Your Study Sessions

  • Break up your study sessions rather than try to cram it all in the night before the test. By studying information in increments, you will be more likely to remember it until test day.
  • If you are struggling to memorize something important, momentary interruptions might actually work to your advantage. While you are focusing on other things, you will find yourself mentally returning to the information you were studying.

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