Cognitive Dissonance: Why We See The Obscure Positives of Our Beliefs And Blind Ourselves To the Prominent Negatives - Deepstash

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The minute we make any decision, we begin to justify the wisdom of our choice and find reasons to dismiss the alternative. Before long, any ambivalence we might have felt at the time of the original decision will have morphed into certainty. Cognitive dissonance explains why, when the facts clash with our preexisting convictions, some of us would sooner jeopardize our lives and everyone else’s than admit to being wrong.

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Cognitive Dissonance: Why We See The Obscure Positives of Our Beliefs And Blind Ourselves To the Prominent Negatives

Cognitive Dissonance: Why We See The Obscure Positives of Our Beliefs And Blind Ourselves To the Prominent Negatives

psychologytoday.com

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The theory of cognitive dissonance proposes that people are averse to inconsistencies within their own minds. It offers one explanation for why people sometimes make an effort to adjust their thinking when their own thoughts, words, or behaviors seem to clash with each other.

When one learns new information that challenges a deeply held belief, for example, or acts in a way that seems to undercut a favorable self-image, that person may feel motivated to somehow resolve the negative feeling that results—to restore cognitive consonance. Though a person ...

When someone tells a lie and feels uncomfortable about it because he fundamentally sees himself as an honest person, he may be experiencing cognitive dissonance. That is, there is mental discord related to a contradiction between one thought (in this case, knowing he did something wrong) ...

Psychologist Leon Festinger published the book A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance in 1957. Among the examples he used to illustrate the theory were doomsday cult members and their explanations for why the world had not ended as they had anticipated. Many experiments have s...

No.

Hypocrisy involves a contradiction between a person’s supposed principles, beliefs, or character and who they really are or how they behave. Cognitive dissonance is the unpleasant mental state that may result if someone really does have

It’s not clear.

While cognitive dissonance is often described as something widely and regularly experienced, efforts to capture it in studies don’t always work, so it could be less common than has been assumed. People do not necessarily experience discomfort in res...

Cognitive dissonance poses a challenge: How can we resolve the uncomfortable feeling that arises when our own thoughts or actions clash with each other? Some responses may be more constructive than others.

A man who learns that his eating habits raise his risk of illness feels the tension between his preferred behavior and the idea that he could be in danger. He might ease this feeling by telling himself that the health warning is exaggerated or, more productively, by deciding to take action to cha...

There are a variety of ways people are thought to resolve the sense of dissonance when cognitions don’t seem to fit together. These may include denying or compartmentalizing unwelcome thoughts, seeking to explain away a thought that doesn’t comport with others, ...

Not necessarily.

By bringing attention to the inconsistencies in our minds, cognitive dissonance may present an opportunity for growth. People who feel it could realize, for example, that they need to update their beliefs to reflect the truth, or change their behav...

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