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You can (and should) train yourself to sleep on your back

https://www.popsci.com/sleep-pain-change-position/

popsci.com

You can (and should) train yourself to sleep on your back
Changing your sleep position can reduce pain and help you wake up ready to tackle the day.

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The Worst Ways To Sleep

The Worst Ways To Sleep
  • Sleeping on the sides, which is how most people sleep, can aggravate heartburn and acidity, especially for those who sleep on their right side.

  • Stomach sleepers are doing a lot of harm to the entirety of their body, from the stomach to the neck/shoulder.

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Back Sleeping

This is the best option and makes your body rejuvenate in the most natural way. Taking a slim pillow under your head helps and it’s best to keep your head at the same level as your body.

The only problem is, this position can worsen the sleep apnea.

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Keep The Same Position While Sleeping

Try to sleep on your back by training yourself to not shift positions, either by keeping pillows on both sides of your body, or to place an object inside your shirt that makes it uncomfortable to go to your default position (which can happen involuntarily).

Most of our body pain and other discomforts can be removed or drastically reduced by sleeping on our back.

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The Elixir of Life

Sleep, something which people take for granted, much like oxygen, is the elixir of life.

Insomniacs must know that sleep is natural, and normal, with each of us having the ...

Tips for Sleeping

  • Get up at the same time every morning.
  • Write affirmations to tell yourself that your body knows how to sleep.
  • Don't involve your over-thinking mind too much.
  • Use your bed is for sleep and sex only.
  • Don't lie awake for more than 20 minutes on the bed, and if you can't sleep, get up and try to do some calming activity like folding laundry.

The Enemy of Sleep

Our body will take care of itself if left on its own. It is our mind which is the culprit, running like a motor, inducing low-grade anxiety inside us.

Sleep is not something you have to do, but something which happens naturally to you. If an insomniac forgets that he is an insomniac, he will have a good night's sleep.

Keep in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle

  • Try to go to sleep and get up at the same time every day;
  • Avoid sleeping in, even on weekends;
  • Limit naps to 15 to 20 minutes in the early afternoon;

Melatonin

Is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure that helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle. 

Your brain secretes more melatonin when it’s dark, making you sleepy, and less when it’s light, making you more alert. 

However, many aspects of modern life can alter your body’s production of melatonin and shift your circadian rhythm

Influence exposure to ligh

During the day:

  • Expose yourself to bright sunlight in the morning. 
  • Spend more time outside during daylight. 
  • Let as much natural light into your home or workspace as possible.

At night:

  • Avoid bright screens within 1-2 hours of your bedtime.
  • Say no to late-night television.
  • Don’t read with backlit devices. 
  • When it’s time to sleep, make sure the room is dark.
  • Keep the lights down if you get up during the night.

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How much sleep is enough

How much sleep is enough

Sleep needs vary from person to person. Age, genetics, lifestyle, and environment all play a role.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, adults need 7-9 hours of sleep a night...

Take a vacation from your alarm clock

To really find out what your individual sleep needs are, do the following experiment for at least two weeks:

  • Pick the same bedtime every night.
  • Turn off your alarm.
  • Record the time you wake up.

You may sleep longer during the first few days, but over the course of a few weeks, a pattern will emerge of how much sleep your body needs each night.

Ask yourself: 'Am I seepy?'

If you often feel tired, your body is telling you that it's not getting enough sleep.

If you're getting eight hours of sleep a night but still feel tired, you may be suffering from a sleep disorder or interrupted sleep.