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8 Rules to Do Everything Better

https://medium.com/personal-growth/8-rules-to-do-everything-better-22184251a406

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8 Rules to Do Everything Better
The most important principles to grow your body and mind "Principles are fundamental truths that serve as the foundations for behavior that gets you what you want out of life," writes investor Ray Dalio in his bestselling book, Principles . Dalio focuses on skills like decision-making, investing, and managing organizations.

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Stress + Rest = Growth

You need to push to the outer limits of your current ability, and then follow that hard work with appropriate recovery time.

This is how you grow your mind and get better at any skill.

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Focus on the Process

The best athletes and entrepreneurs aren’t focused on being the best; they’re focused on constant self-improvement.

Concentrating on the process is best for both performance and mental health. It lifts off your shoulders a huge burden, so you can concentrate on the things you can control.

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Stay Humble

Knowledge is always evolving and advancing — if you want to evolve and advance with it, you need to keep an open mind.

And to keep an open mind, leave your ego at the door. 

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Build Your Tribe

The old saying that you’re the average of the five people you spend the most time with is actually true.

Research shows that motivation is contagious:  if you work on mental tasks with people who are internally driven and love what they do, you’re more likely to end up the same way.

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Take Small, Consistent Steps

Small and consistent victories compound over time, leading to massive gains.

Habits build upon themselves. If you want to make any kind of significant change, be wise and do so gradually and over time.

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“You’ve got to be a minimalist to be a maximalist; if you want to be really good at, master, and thoroughly enjoy one thing, you’ve got to say no to many others.”

Michael Joyner

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Make the Hard Thing Easier

Don’t just think about how you’re going to accomplish your goals; think about how you’re going to design for them.

Rather than relying completely on self-control, intentionally design your environment to make the hard thing easier. 

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Remember to Experience Joy

We sometimes forget to be fully present and enjoy special moments.

These kinds of moments give and strength and happiness: When things aren’t going well, we can fall back on happy memories to give us the resilience to move forward.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Trigger, Behavior, and Reward

Much of human behavior follows a predictable cycle: trigger, behavior, reward.

For behaviors that you want to do, the goal is to make triggers salient, the behavior easy, and the reward as...

Rig Your Environment

In habit speak, don’t underestimate the power of everything around you to act as a trigger. 

A better option than relying purely on willpower is to consciously design your environment to remove the temptations that regularly get in the way of what you’re trying to do. 

Enlist a Community

it’s not just your physical environment that influences your behavior but also your social one. Motivation is contagious. 

A community also helps with accountability. If you’ve made a commitment to another person or group, you’re more likely to stick with it.

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Goals and directors of a meeting

Without someone clearly responsible, meetings have a high risk of being directionless and unproductive.

Every meeting should be aimed at achieving someone’s goals; that person ...

Align objectives with appropriate types of communication

Make clear what type of communication you are going to have in light of the objectives and priorities. 

If your goal is to have people with different opinions work through their differences (i.e., open-minded debate), you’ll run your meeting differently than if its goal is to educate.

Asertiveness and open-mindedness

It is up to the meeting leader to balance conflicting perspectives, push through impasses and decide how to spend time wisely.

If you’re running the conversation, you should be weighing the potential cost in the time that it takes to explore opinions of inexperienced employees versus the potential gain in being able to assess their thinking and gain a better understanding of what they’re like.

#1 New York Times Bestseller “Significant...The book is both instructive and surprisingly moving.” —The New York Times Ray Dalio, one of the world’s most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he’s developed, refined, and used over the past forty years to create unique results in both life and business—and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals. In 1975, Ray Dalio founded an investment firm, Bridgewater Associates, out of his two-bedroom apartment in New York City. Forty years later, Bridgewater has made more money for its clients than any other hedge fund in history and grown into the fifth most important private company in the United States, according to Fortune magazine. Dalio himself has been named to Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people in the world. Along the way, Dalio discovered a set of unique principles that have led to Bridgewater’s exceptionally effective culture, which he describes as “an idea meritocracy that strives to achieve meaningful work and meaningful relationships through radical transparency.” It is these principles, and not anything special about Dalio—who grew up an ordinary kid in a middle-class Long Island neighborhood—that he believes are the reason behind his success. In Principles, Dalio shares what he’s learned over the course of his remarkable career. He argues that life, management, economics, and investing can all be systemized into rules and understood like machines. The book’s hundreds of practical lessons, which are built around his cornerstones of “radical truth” and “radical transparency,” include Dalio laying out the most effective ways for individuals and organizations to make decisions, approach challenges, and build strong teams. He also describes the innovative tools the firm uses to bring an idea meritocracy to life, such as creating “baseball cards” for all employees that distill their strengths and weaknesses, and employing computerized decision-making systems to make believability-weighted decisions. While the book brims with novel ideas for organizations and institutions, Principles also offers a clear, straightforward approach to decision-making that Dalio believes anyone can apply, no matter what they’re seeking to achieve. Here, from a man who has been called both “the Steve Jobs of investing” and “the philosopher king of the financial universe” (CIO magazine), is a rare opportunity to gain proven advice unlike anything you’ll find in the conventional business press.

Principles = Fundamental Truths

Principles = Fundamental Truths
  • Principles are essential truths that work as the foundations for the behavior that leads you where you want in life.
  • Those principles that are most valuable come f...

Pre-Packaged Principles

Your principles should reflect the values you truly believe in.

While it isn’t always a bad thing to use the principles of someone else (it’s hard to come up with your own, and often much wisdom has gone into those already created), adopting pre-packaged principles without much reflection can expose you to the risk of inconsistency with your true values.

Principles In Relationships

Your principles will influence your standards of behavior. In relationships with other people, your and their principles will decide how you collaborate.

People who have shared values and principles get along. People who don’t share values and principles, experience misunderstandings and conflict with one another. Most of the times in relationships, our principles are ambiguous.