How to Evaluate, Accept, Reject, or Negotiate a Job Offer - Deepstash

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How to Evaluate, Accept, Reject, or Negotiate a Job Offer

https://hbr.org/2017/04/how-to-evaluate-accept-reject-or-negotiate-a-job-offer

hbr.org

How to Evaluate, Accept, Reject, or Negotiate a Job Offer
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Shift your mindset about the job offer

Shift your mindset about the job offer

Think about the offer in terms of your development, quality of life, and the variety of the work you want to do. Think about the trade-offs you are going to make.

When an employer extends a job offer to you, he has psychologically committed to you. You have more leverage to shape your job description and improve your salary and benefits package immediately after you are made an offer than in your first two years of employment.

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Commitment and enthusiasm

The purpose of the interview is to get the offer. The next stage is about considering the offer, then negotiating with your new employer.

Employers need to feel that you are committed. Continue to be enthusiastic in your dealings with your prospective manager so you don't sound uncertain that you want the job.

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Metrics for assessing a job offer

Think about what is important in your professional and private life, then assess the offer against these metrics.

  • Salary. Even when the money is enough, you need to figure out if it's worthy of your knowledge and skills and in line with the local market.
  • Job content. Consider whether you will derive job satisfaction from the offer. To answer this question, you need to know the kinds of activities you want to be involved in and the skills you want to use. You will need a deep understanding of what's expected of you to decide whether you do indeed want the job.
  • Cultural fit. Ask yourself if it is a place where you will be happy, challenged, and where you will thrive. It might make sense to do a trial run to see what your colleagues are like.
  • Flexibility, vacation, and other perks. Flexible hours and vacation time are an increasingly valuable perk. During the evaluation stage, it's important to find out whether current employees are afforded such benefits.
  • Other options. Also assess your walk-away alternatives. Think about the offer in terms of the cost and benefit of starting the job search process over again, of staying in your current job, or of first seeing what other offers materialize.

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Negotiating a job offer: Devise your plan

Once you know what elements of the offer you would like to change, you need to decide which parts you are going to press and how you will do it.

If you are dealing with an intermediary, such as an HR administrator or a recruiter, remember not only to make requests but also to ask questions, give information, and share ideas to make the job more palatable.

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Be tough but cheerful during negotiation

During the stage of the classic negotiation, maximize the cost of the things you are prepared to accept while minimizing the things you're asking for.

For example, "I'm happy with the role and responsibilities, but I would like to work from home one day per week." Come across as a cheerful but firm negotiator.

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Say no (politely) if the job feels not right

There will be some give and take in negotiations for a new job, but if everything you ask for is a "no," it demonstrates inflexibility on the part of your prospective employer and could be a red flag.

If your internal monitoring system tells you that you should not take the job, listen. However, turn it down politely as they could be potential customers, potential advisors, or even your future employers.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Your Final Decision

While making your final decision, keep in mind that:

  • You are clear about your deadline for signing the job offer.
  • Assert your deadline continually.
  • U...

Companies Love Negotiating

Companies like you to submit early in the negotiation and be done with it, so it's best not to fall in their traps and pressure tactics.

Respectfully moving forward, showing transparency and maturity signals to the company that you are not just playing games, and are moving towards a final decision. Being honest, open and communicative is the key.

Negotiating is all about relationship, with communication being the bedrock.

Not Just About Money

  • There are various dimensions in a job to be motivated by, not just what you get paid. Your training period, kind of work, kind of team, and the other things you value, like work-life balance, for instance.
  • You also need to understand what the company values. Salary is a recurring cost, that increases over time while being a subject of gossip due to inequality. A joining bonus is a one-time expense and isn't public.
  • There are other perks to negotiate for, like relocation bonus, which can be easier to arrange.

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Negotiating without being a pushover

Do:

  • Frame the negotiations as a problem-solving challenge.
  • Take the time to make small talk. It’ll build connections you can leverage later on.
  • Stress t...

Negotiation

... is a key life skill, an inherently interpersonal activity that requires a good understanding of human psyche, and it is vital to your success.

Negotiator perform 2 cognitive tasks:

  1. Judgement: Evaluate the content of the available options for its fairness.
  2. Choice: Determine which available option is preferred.

Use a Red Herring

Instead of making one single offer, try offering 3 possible scenarios:

  1.  Something that works for you but can be very expensive for the other party. A win-lose.
  2.  The red herring. Something that is a lose-lose for both parties. An option through which no one wins.
  3. Something that is a middle ground and a win-win for both.
Social psychology shows when you present  more options (the red herring), the other party will rarely decline all the options.