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Top 5 common health myths debunked

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321697.php

medicalnewstoday.com

Top 5 common health myths debunked
Throughout the centuries, many health myths have arisen. Some are tried, tested, and taken as fact, but others are nothing more than fantasy. In this article, we debunk some of the latter. Health-related myths are common and arise for a variety of reasons.

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Eight glasses of water

We should indeed be drinking enough water every day for good overall health. What this amount is, differ from person to person.

There is no scientific evidence that backs up drinking 8 glasses of water for overall health. The 8 glasses of water have been traced back to a single paragraph in a government report from 1945. 

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Catch a cold by being cold

You can't catch a cold from being cold.  A virus is responsible for contracting a cold. We become infected with viruses when we are in close quarters with other people infected with a virus.

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Cracking your joints can lead to arthritis

Cracking joints do not cause arthritis. Research done found people who crack their joints are at the same risk of getting arthritis than those who don't.

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Deodorant can cause breast cancer

Nearly all of the studies that have tested the link between deodorant and breast cancer found no evidence to support the claim.

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Eggs are bad for the heart

Research suggests there is no link between eating eggs and a cholesterol imbalance.

Eggs are rich in nutrients and a good source of a nutritious food.

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Drink 8 Glasses of Water a Day

Everyone has a different requirement for water. Temperature, humidity, size, age, gender and activity have an influence on your fluid needs.

Instead, drink when you are thirsty.

Eggs Harm Your Heart

Eggs have a lot of cholesterol compared to other foods. Although cholesterol in the blood is strongly related to heart disease, eating cholesterol is weakly associated with raising the cholesterol levels in your blood.

Eggs have other heart-protecting properties and eating it probably won't harm your heart.

Cancer or Alzheimer’s From Antiperspirant

  • A chain email in the 1990s was responsible for the false belief that antiperspirant was raising the risk of breast cancer. 
  • When researchers found higher ratios of aluminum in the brains of Alzheimer's patients, aluminum in antiperspirant was suspect. But it seems aluminum in antiperspirant is hardly absorbed by your skin.

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There is no "best diet"

The “best” diet is a theme: an emphasis on vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, and plain water for thirst. 

That can be with or without seafood; with or...

Best foods don’t have labels

Because they are just one ingredient: avocado, lentils, blueberries, broccoli, almonds, etc.

The "Age" of vegetables

The best vegetables are likely to be fresh and locally sourced, but flash frozen is nearly as good (as freezing delays aging). Those “fresh” vegetables that spend a long time in storage or transit are probably the least nutritious.

Soya benefits

Soya has only been a common part of the Western diet for around 60 years. Soy products include soy milk, soy burgers and soy-based meat replacements, tofu tempeh, miso and soya sauce.

Soya ha...

The soya controversy

Soya contains a high content of isoflavones that have estrogenic properties. It means they act like estrogen, the primary female sex hormone, and bind to estrogen receptors in the body.

Estrogen can fuel the growth of some types of breast cancer, but it is not clear from research if isoflavones themselves contribute to cancer. 

Cancer protection

There is a 30% lower risk of developing breast cancer among women in Asian countries who are known for their high soya intake (compared to American women). Also, there is a 21% reduction in mortality among women with breast cancer who consumed more soya.

It is not certain why soya protects against cancer risk. It could be because its isoflavones can increase apoptosis (a genetically programmed mechanism that tells cells to self-destruct when they get DNA damage they’re not able to repair). Without this process, damaged cells can turn into cancer.