The Way Therapy Works
There is growing research on how therapy actually works. Psychological communication, dialogue, and intervention can work even better than pills.
This seems even more intriguing when we see that there are contradictory methods deployed to cure the same kind of problem.

@katherine_gll245

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Health

  • Some therapists are just there to listen and provide a backdrop.
  • Even the silence that they exhibit seems to kindle the patients into divulging more of their most uncomfortable truths.
  • Others keep the sequence of assignments and tests lined up, never pausing.
  • Therapists play varied roles to get some valuable information out of the patient and make him better.

No particular form of therapy is proven to be better or more effective than others.

Different people prefer or respond to different forms of therapy.

All therapies share a bond, an emotional connection, or a collaboration between the therapist and the client(patient).

Research suggests that effective therapies use empathy, warmth, positivism, hopefulness and emotional expressiveness, whereas the ineffective ones tend to have a strict approach.

If the client and the therapist share a deeper, more primal relationship, which has the same developmental characteristics as that of a mother and her child, it leads to an effective result.

Humans have an inborn, universal need for comfort, security, care and for being attached to someone. During our childhood, we are comforted and protected by the older and wiser adults, which shape our minds.

Early interactions with caregivers can dramatically affect your beliefs about yourself, your expectations of others, and the way you process information, cope with stress and regulate your emotions as an adult.

Problems such as anxiety, depression, loneliness, eating disorders, and alcohol/substance abuse can be treated with the patient having a new relationship.

A good therapist can temporarily become a figure of attachment, treating the patient in a way a nurturing mother would.

Therapists, by having regular meetings with their clients, develop a healthy intimacy, in which there is trust along with a deep understanding that increases as the sessions progress.

Eventually, the client is able to fully connect with the therapist and is also able to mirror himself.

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Avoidant Attachment Style

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As someone with an avoidant-dismissive attachment style:

  • You don’t feel you need others.
  • The more someone tries to get close to you, the more you tend to withdraw.
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8

IDEAS

Attachment Theory
  • Secure attachment is caused by healthy emotional communication.
  • Lovers who are anxious and insecure tend to have low self-esteem.
  • Avoidance of attachment is done by lovers who are emotionally unavailable and self-sufficient.
  1. A good therapist attended an excellent university. Training is important, but it doesn't guarantee that a therapist is effective.
  2. A good therapist has a doctoral degree. Many therapists have a master's degree and yet they are highly effective.
  3. A good therapist has written numerous books. Just because someone is a prolific writer doesn't mean that she's an effective therapist.
  4.  A good therapist uses only scientifically validated techniques. Research shows that techniques have little to do with effective therapy.


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