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Mindful context switching

https://nesslabs.com/mindful-context-switching

nesslabs.com

Mindful context switching
Multitasking has its cost. Learn how to improve your productivity and work better with your team by using mindful context switching.

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The Perils Of Multitasking

The Perils Of Multitasking

We all have limited time and unlimited things to do, and we try to juggle between work, personal projects, self-care and our social life. As we try to focus on what matters the most, we get in the web of complexities that come from managing a lot of important and competing tasks.

  • If we only focus on a single task, our responsiveness towards the demands of the world suffers.
  • If we are available to all and extremely responsive to what they need from us, our own progress suffers.

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The Origin Of 'Multitasking'

The word ‘multitask’ is actually a computer term invented by IBM in 1965, showcasing how a computer chip can handle multiple tasks at the same time.

According to psychiatrist Edward Hallowell, multitasking is a mythical construct of the mind, where we mistakenly believe we can effectively perform more than one task at the same time.

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Mindful Context Switching: A Delicate Balance

One has to find a balance between optimizing one’s own output while enabling our peers and collaborators to move forward.

Mindful context switching is a scientific way to carry on with your daily tasks in the most efficient manner while not being unresponsive to other matters that need your attention and input.

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The Steps Of Mindful Context Switching

  1. Defining your level of responsiveness based on the kind of work being done.
  2. Design a realistic ‘chunk’ of work that is meaningful and feels like progress. Breaking down your work into chunks makes it easier and is a modular approach to the tasks at hand.
  3. Ensure that you plan your work calendar based on the broken-down chunks of work.
  4. Ensure you communicate your response times to others.
  5. Review your calendar and improvise on your workweek.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Mindfulness at work

Mindfulness at work

Means being consciously present in what you’re doing, while you’re doing it, as well as managing your mental and emotional state. 

If you’re writing a report, mindfulness requires...

1 min/session

That’s the minimum required for a mini-mediation.

Just focus on your sense. You don’t need to close your eyes. You don’t even need to be sitting down.

Use Mindful Reminders

You can use interruptions as hooks to make you more mindful.

Every time your phone rings, take a mindful breath. Every time you hear the ping of a text message, pause to be mindful of your surroundings rather than immediately reacting by checking the message. 

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Learning from others

  • Success leaves clues. That's why we can learn from the habits and methods of successful individuals. 
  • Failure does, too. So we can learn from past mistakes.&n...

Productivity tools to consider: 🗒

  • Create a schedule for your day and stick to it!
  • Chunk: Group like tasks together into blocks of time, then focus on those specifics. 
  • RPM: Short for Results-oriented/Purpose-driven/Massive Action Plan: a system to uncover what you want and then reap the rewards. 
  • Harness the power of habit and productivity will become second nature. 

Productivity defined

Being busy and always moving through tasks is not the same as being productive.

Productivity is getting the results you aim for with less time and effort. When you are productive, you won't be chasing deadlines or running behind schedule to get done. You'll probably be ahead of schedule.

Multitasking vs monotasking

Multitasking fractures your attention between multiple tasks at the same time; monotasking fully focuses on one task.

  • Multitasking is less about being able to work o...

Our brains are not wired for multitasking

When we multitask, we’re putting tremendous stress on our brains as we flit backward and forwards between different tasks.

Multitasking is a brain drain that exhausts the mind, zaps cognitive resources and, if left unchecked, condemns us to early mental decline and decreased sharpness.

The dangers of context switching

Context switching is essentially bad for us: every time we switch between doing our work and checking our phones for example, we experience a “transaction cost” that drains our energy and slows us down.