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Rise and Shine! Sleep Better and Wake Up at the Same Time Every Day

https://www.verywellhealth.com/30-days-to-better-sleep-3973920

verywellhealth.com

Rise and Shine! Sleep Better and Wake Up at the Same Time Every Day
Why is it important to wake up at the same time every day? Discover the role of circadian rhythms, sleep drive, and how sleeping in causes insomnia.

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How To Sleep Better

How To Sleep Better
  • Many people have trouble sleeping and need to set a path toward better sleep.
  • The first step to the path is to wake up at the same time every day, including weekends.
  • It does not matter what time you decide to wake up, as different people have different lifestyles and sleeping patterns.

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The Science Behind A Consistent Waking Up Time

Our bodies follow a certain circadian rhythm that relies on us following a consistent sleeping time.

One can use the morning sunrise as an anchor to your wake time. Having a fixed time also builds a sleep drive gradually, as the body gets in the habit of falling asleep at the same time at night.

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Benefits Of A Fixed Wake Time

  1. Less sleep inertia and an easier transition from sleep.
  2. Easier to fall asleep, with less sleep depravity or need for naps.
  3. Less need for coffee, and a cheery mood.
  4. An alert mind, sharper focus, and improved short-term memory.
  5. More healing of the body.
  6. Less irritation during the day.
  7. Better immune system functioning.
  8. Better working and driving ability.

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Don't Push The Snooze Button

We should follow the alarm that is set, and get up at the time. If it is slightly difficult, you can set up multiple alarms in the initial mornings, but do not hit the snooze button while half asleep. That’s cheating.

If you have trouble sleeping due to sleep apnea or are showing signs of insomnia, do consult a sleep specialist.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

How much sleep is enough

How much sleep is enough

Sleep needs vary from person to person. Age, genetics, lifestyle, and environment all play a role.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, adults need 7-9 hours of sleep a night...

Take a vacation from your alarm clock

To really find out what your individual sleep needs are, do the following experiment for at least two weeks:

  • Pick the same bedtime every night.
  • Turn off your alarm.
  • Record the time you wake up.

You may sleep longer during the first few days, but over the course of a few weeks, a pattern will emerge of how much sleep your body needs each night.

Ask yourself: 'Am I seepy?'

If you often feel tired, your body is telling you that it's not getting enough sleep.

If you're getting eight hours of sleep a night but still feel tired, you may be suffering from a sleep disorder or interrupted sleep.

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Keep in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle

  • Try to go to sleep and get up at the same time every day;
  • Avoid sleeping in, even on weekends;
  • Limit naps to 15 to 20 minutes in the early afternoon;

Melatonin

Is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure that helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle. 

Your brain secretes more melatonin when it’s dark, making you sleepy, and less when it’s light, making you more alert. 

However, many aspects of modern life can alter your body’s production of melatonin and shift your circadian rhythm

Influence exposure to ligh

During the day:

  • Expose yourself to bright sunlight in the morning. 
  • Spend more time outside during daylight. 
  • Let as much natural light into your home or workspace as possible.

At night:

  • Avoid bright screens within 1-2 hours of your bedtime.
  • Say no to late-night television.
  • Don’t read with backlit devices. 
  • When it’s time to sleep, make sure the room is dark.
  • Keep the lights down if you get up during the night.

The Science of Sleep

The average adult spends 36 % (or about one-third) of his or her life asleep.

Purpose of Sleep:

  • Restoration
  • Memory Consolidation
  • Metabolic Health

Restoration

The first purpose of sleep is restoration.

Every day, your brain accumulates metabolic waste as it goes about its normal neural activities. Sleeping restores the brains healthy condition by removing these waste products. Accumulation of these waste products has been linked to many brain-related disorders.

Memory Consolidation

The second purpose of sleep is memory consolidation.

Sleep is crucial for memory consolidation, which is responsible for your long term memories. Insufficient or fragmented sleep can hamper your ability to remember facts and feelings/emotions.