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How to be Effective at Working Remotely

https://medium.com/facebook-design/how-to-be-effective-at-working-remotely-b832a0eaa933#

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How to be Effective at Working Remotely
Over-communicate It's always safe to assume people don't know what you're thinking. You'll find the more you communicate with others, the more they will reciprocate. If you don't tell them, they will simply just never have known. Ask them questions, tell them what you're doing, be responsive, and get over that you think you're bugging them too much.

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Over-communicate

Assume that people don’t know what you’re thinking. And you’ll find the more you communicate with others, the more they will reciprocate. 

Ask questions, tell the team what you’re doing, be responsive, and get over that you think you’re bugging them too much. The more you communicate, the shorter the physical distance between you appears.

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Share Frequently and Get Feedback

Constantly send screenshots and ideas. Give your team a glimpse into your head throughout the day so they can see your creative process. 

Share your unfinished work in progress. A single reply from a teammate can steer your entire project in a better direction. Get feedback on your work early on so you can evolve sooner.

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Build Trust

Build Trust

Build trust in your team by constantly reminding them how dependable you are. 

You can do this by being the first one to respond in threads, providing your feedback, leading initiatives, and not just delivering your work on time, but delivering it early.

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Share Your Opinion

Share Your Opinion

People have short term memories, so keep making clear the fact that you’re here and you have an opinion. 

Provide feedback on other people’s work and be convicted, without ego.

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Set Expectations

It’s up to you to make sure your team knows how to work best with you.

If they aren’t regularly sharing progress with you, bug them. Ask them questions every day. Make it known that your awareness matters a lot, and affects the outcome of the project.

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Advise with permission

If you feel the need to offer unsolicited advice, ask them, “Do you want some ideas to improve the situation?” 

This way they have the option to say no, and they’ll likel...

Give them a rant window

The best way to be a friend is to allow them to tell the story repeatedly. Then they need to work through it and let it go. 

Tell them you’re there to listen to everything they need to say. Once they’ve gotten all out, you’d love to help them move on.

Be honest

If you don’t know how someone feels, let them know that you haven’t been there before, but you’ll try to put yourself in their shoes to help as best you can.

Also, don’t be afraid to let them know you don’t have anything to say. You can still be an ear, take some time to think about it, and then share your thoughts later.

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9 Tips To Give Constructive Criticism

  1. Use the "feedback sandwich" method when advising. Give a positive comment, then the feedback that could potentially be construed as criticism, and finish by reiterating the positive. Th...

Constructive Criticism

However needed it may be, people often view criticism as hurtful and feel attacked. And that puts them on the defensive, meaning they won’t be able to truly absorb what’s being criticized.

That’s why constructive criticism is a helpful skill to develop when dealing with other people. Knowing how to do it drastically affects how the message is received.

Use The "Sandwich" Approach And Be Specific On The Expected Results

"Sandwiching" your critique between two positive things about the person's softens the blow, and avoids it coming off like an attack. The mix of positive and negative makes people more likel...

Give Feedback, Not Instruction

Keep your criticism to your observations, and the impact they have. Don't try to fix the problem, just identify it.

Offer to help fix the problem, and to support the solution that the other person comes up with. Unless you know how to do the work your coworker is doing, don't try to solve it for them—they'll ignore your feedback and you.

Give Kind Criticism, And Remember The Point Of It

The point of your criticism is to help someone improve, or to correct a problem, and your feedbacks should carry that message. If you’re doing anything but that, reevaluate whether you actually have legitimate criticism to give, or you just need to talk to someone.

Offer positive and specific suggestions to alleviate the issue at hand, or identify the problem clearly without talking about the person, just the issue.