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Living life like the Danish - 4 ways to be happier

Appreciate the little things

Hygge is the Danish concept which involves creating a warm and contented atmosphere and enjoying the good things in life with people you love. 

Hygge is about everyday happiness. It’s slowing down, being in the present moment and celebrating the simple pleasures in life. 

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Living life like the Danish - 4 ways to be happier

Living life like the Danish - 4 ways to be happier

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/discovering-hygge-in-copenhagen/danish-living/

telegraph.co.uk

5

Key Ideas

A happy country

Denmark is famous for being one of the happiest countries in the world.

It is known for being one of the most egalitarian countries in the world and its high levels of wellbeing are often attributed to its welfare system, where higher taxes provide free healthcare, school and university education, and government spending on children and the elderly is higher per capita than any other country in the world. 

Prioritise a work-life balance

The Danes have better work-life balance than anywhere else in the world, with only 2 per cent regularly working long hours (compared to an average figure of 13 per cent for other countries). 

All employees are entitled to a minimum of five weeks paid holiday a year, and when Danes are at work, they often have flexible working environments. 

Appreciate the little things

Hygge is the Danish concept which involves creating a warm and contented atmosphere and enjoying the good things in life with people you love. 

Hygge is about everyday happiness. It’s slowing down, being in the present moment and celebrating the simple pleasures in life. 

Spending time with loved ones

Spending quality time with the people we love is one of the easiest routes to happiness.

Danes are really good at making time for friends and family, with regular meals or time scheduled in together. It all stems back to the days when gathering food and wood were a crucial part of surviving the Danish winter. You had to help out neighbours, your family and friends to survive.

Trusting one another

Denmark has been shown to be one of the most trusting nations in Europe

79 per cent of Danes trust most people”— and if you trust your neighbours (and your neighbour’s neighbours) you’re less anxious and have the headspace to be happy.

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Back in 1999, a support group called Bright Point was formed to fill the need of friends. But when people came together, no one talked. It was only after games were introduced as a catalyst that friendships started forming. Later, making meals and exercising was added successfully.

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Complaining or Encouraging

If your partner is taking on a new challenge or trying to solve a problem or fix something that’s broken, do you complain about their success and pace or do you offer encouragement and act as a cheerleader? 

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