A happy country

Denmark is famous for being one of the happiest countries in the world.

It is known for being one of the most egalitarian countries in the world and its high levels of wellbeing are often attributed to its welfare system, where higher taxes provide free healthcare, school and university education, and government spending on children and the elderly is higher per capita than any other country in the world. 

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Self Improvement

Prioritise a work-life balance

The Danes have better work-life balance than anywhere else in the world, with only 2 per cent regularly working long hours (compared to an average figure of 13 per cent for other countries). 

All employees are entitled to a minimum of five weeks paid holiday a year, and when Danes are at work, they often have flexible working environments. 

Appreciate the little things

Hygge is the Danish concept which involves creating a warm and contented atmosphere and enjoying the good things in life with people you love. 

Hygge is about everyday happiness. It’s slowing down, being in the present moment and celebrating the simple pleasures in life. 

Spending time with loved ones

Spending quality time with the people we love is one of the easiest routes to happiness.

Danes are really good at making time for friends and family, with regular meals or time scheduled in together. It all stems back to the days when gathering food and wood were a crucial part of surviving the Danish winter. You had to help out neighbours, your family and friends to survive.

Trusting one another

Denmark has been shown to be one of the most trusting nations in Europe

79 per cent of Danes trust most people”— and if you trust your neighbours (and your neighbour’s neighbours) you’re less anxious and have the headspace to be happy.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES

There are three different types of happiness measures:

  1. How we experience positive emotions.
  2. How we experience negative emotions.
  3. Life evaluations (how happy we are with our lives as a whole.)

Brain scans show that volunteers who rated highly on happiness surveys had more grey matter mass in the precuneus, involved in self-reflection and consciousness.

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IDEAS

"Lagom"

It's part of the Swedish culture. It means “Not too little. Not too much. Just right.

The concept encourages an overarching balance across our lives: everything in moderation.

Ventilen, or “friend to one” in Danish, is an organization that helps 15-to-25-year-olds get together twice a week with two or three volunteers. Together, the people in the group play games, make meals, go to the cinema, and build human connections.

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