Your Brain Is On Autopilot More Than You Think-Here's How To Wake It Up - Deepstash

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Your Brain Is On Autopilot More Than You Think-Here's How To Wake It Up

https://www.fastcompany.com/3061366/your-brain-is-on-autopilot-more-than-you-think-heres-how-to-wake-i

fastcompany.com

Your Brain Is On Autopilot More Than You Think-Here's How To Wake It Up
Wednesday. Hump Day. The part of the week when we're over the hill and begin sliding toward the weekend. If hitting midweek feels even a little bit better than slogging through Monday or Tuesday does, well, you're not alone. According to the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, the worst day of the week goes to Tuesday -but just barely.

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About Monday

About Monday
Monday, the day office working people dread, may not be that bad.
Monday is a fresh start, a clean slate after the weekend. Our brains are better primed to make decisions on Monday.

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The Monday Case

The Monday Case

Google searches for 'Diet', 'Gym' 'Quit smoking' and other common goals spike on a Monday.

On Monday we are slightly more self-aware and can envision the bigger picture of our ongoing lives.

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Out Of Auto-Pilot Mode

Out Of Auto-Pilot Mode

The first of the month, or the year, and the first day of the week make us stop and think whether we are headed the right way in our lives.

It draws a line in our ongoing life, marking an opportunity for us to improve how we are at home and work.

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Switching between tasks

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Task switching and focus

Taking on additional tasks simultaneously can destroy up to 80% of your productive time:

  • Focusing on one task at a time = 100% of your productive time available.
  • Juggling two tasks at a time = 40% of your productive time for each and 20% lost to context switching.
  • Juggling three tasks at a time = 20% of your productive time for each and 40% lost to context switching.

A schedule for sustained attention

It includes:
  • Large chunks of focused “flow” time for more demanding projects.
  • “Themed” days to reduce the need to recalibrate between different tasks.
  • Advanced planning so you can prioritize meaningful work.
  • Realistic time set aside for admin, communication, and meetings.
  • Clear expectations for your teammates so they know when not to interrupt you.

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No One Likes Mondays

No One Likes Mondays

Various studies have documented the Monday Blues, which essentially is an imposition on the working person, a loss of freedom coupled with the arrival of work-related stress.

Counter The Monday Blues: An Early Start

  • Prepare mentally, physically and logistically for Monday in advance, to decrease the dread of unknown problems or tasks.
  • It is helpful to have sound sleep on Sunday, with the alcohol consumption minimized.
  • It is extremely beneficial to get to work early on a Monday, getting a headstart on things.
  • Plan ahead for the week with something to look forward to, maybe on the coming Friday.

Manage Your Mondays Like A Pro

  • A special Monday treat, casual dress day, or a pizza day for the entire team can be something to look forward to. Even not cooking that day, or a workout class can bring a creative break to the stressful routine.
  • Focusing on your thoughts and feelings helps you absorb the negativity and understand how to steer the mind towards a solution.
  • Less social media surfing during weekends also contributes to your positive mental outlook, as the feeds are mostly negative or provocative.

Decision-making errors

Most decision-making errors boil down to:

  • logical fallacies (over-generalizations, comparing apples and oranges, circular thinking)
  • limiting beliefs (underes...

Confirmation Bias

If you already have an opinion about something before you've even tried to figure it out, chances are you'll over-value information that confirms that opinion.

Think about what kinds of information you would expect to find to support alternative outcomes.

Attribution Bias

The “fundamental attribution error,” is when we excuse our own mistakes but blame other people for theirs.

Give other people the chance to explain themselves before judging their behavior.