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Negotiating Your Next Job

https://hbr.org/2021/01/negotiating-your-next-job

hbr.org

Negotiating Your Next Job
Focus on your role, responsibilities, and career trajectory, not your salary.

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Career negotiation and opportunities for advancement

Career negotiation and opportunities for advancement

Professionals often think of career negotiation as bargaining over an offer package.

Although reaching agreement on pay and benefits is necessary, it is vital to think more broadly about your career to include opportunities for advancement.

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Career negotiations fall into three categories

  • Asking negotiations. You propose something that's standard for someone in your role or at your level.
  • Bending negotiations. You request a personal exception or unusual arrangement, for example, remote work setup or a promotion where you lack conventional qualifications.
  • Shaping negotiations. You propose ways to play a role in changing your organizational environment or creating a new initiative.

Organizations may be very open to shaping negotiations during challenging or fast-changing times,

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Job negotiation: what, how, and with whom to negotiate

People often walk blind into a potential negotiation. They lack information on what is negotiable. It is vital to reduce vagueness and ensure that you get a fair opportunity.

Write down all the questions you have.

  • What is potentially negotiable?
  • How should I negotiate?
  • Who will be my counterparts, and what do they care about?

Find answers from talent professionals, a media search, or contact a professional on LinkedIn who can tell you more about the hiring manager.

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Think strategically about how you negotiate your job

Negotiating your role - the scope of your authority and your developmental opportunities - may benefit your career more than negotiating your pay. Negotiating your workload, responsibilities, location and travel requirements may be critical to advance professionally.

Keep your eye on larger objectives. Negotiate with the right parties about the right issues.

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Job negotiation: start with your career goals

Negotiators frequently start their preparation focused on the opportunity right in front of them, such as a job offer.

Instead, consider your short- and long-term goals, then work backwards from those objectives to define the next steps you want to take. Include quality-of-life and professional considerations.

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Enhance your job negotiations through relationships

As you try to reduce ambiguity, you will think of people who might give you information, advice, or social support. Also, figure out who will speak up in favour of your proposal.

Talk to key stakeholders individually to get their feedback and input. It enables you to explore people's interests and concerns and incorporate their ideas into your game plan. If you're concerned about appearing conniving or manipulative, explain that you're seeking input on an idea you have.

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It takes time to implement negotiations

There will be false starts and reversals. Maximise the odds of your success by setting targets for yourself that are specific and realistic. Negotiations often fizzle out because larger goals become buried by everyday work.

Great careers are not made in a vacuum. You need work and life partners, and negotiation is at the heart of finding ways to realise your path.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Your Final Decision

While making your final decision, keep in mind that:

  • You are clear about your deadline for signing the job offer.
  • Assert your deadline continually.
  • U...

Companies Love Negotiating

Companies like you to submit early in the negotiation and be done with it, so it's best not to fall in their traps and pressure tactics.

Respectfully moving forward, showing transparency and maturity signals to the company that you are not just playing games, and are moving towards a final decision. Being honest, open and communicative is the key.

Negotiating is all about relationship, with communication being the bedrock.

Not Just About Money

  • There are various dimensions in a job to be motivated by, not just what you get paid. Your training period, kind of work, kind of team, and the other things you value, like work-life balance, for instance.
  • You also need to understand what the company values. Salary is a recurring cost, that increases over time while being a subject of gossip due to inequality. A joining bonus is a one-time expense and isn't public.
  • There are other perks to negotiate for, like relocation bonus, which can be easier to arrange.

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Negotiation

Whether it is a high-stakes deal, the price of a used car, or a family issue, we all are bargaining and getting into negotiations.

Negotiation is 90 % planning, along with being educated and ...

The 7 Elements

A negotiation does not have to be a uni-dimensional, one-shot activity.

There are seven points to prepare yourself with:

  1. What do people want?
  2. What is my Plan B?
  3. Creating Value using shared interests.
  4. What's relevant and what's persuasive.
  5. One-shot or multiple rounds?
  6. The best way to communicate.
  7. What are my commitments?

What People Want

Knowing the other party's needs, wants and desires, getting to know what drives their negotiation, is crucial information in the planning stage.

The more we understand the interests of the other negotiating party, the better we can help them get what they want while taking care of our interests.

Shift your mindset about the job offer

Shift your mindset about the job offer

Think about the offer in terms of your development, quality of life, and the variety of the work you want to do. Think about the trade-offs you are going to make.

W...

Commitment and enthusiasm

The purpose of the interview is to get the offer. The next stage is about considering the offer, then negotiating with your new employer.

Employers need to feel that you are committed. Continue to be enthusiastic in your dealings with your prospective manager so you don't sound uncertain that you want the job.

Metrics for assessing a job offer

Think about what is important in your professional and private life, then assess the offer against these metrics.

  • Salary. Even when the money is enough, you need to figure out if it's worthy of your knowledge and skills and in line with the local market.
  • Job content. Consider whether you will derive job satisfaction from the offer. To answer this question, you need to know the kinds of activities you want to be involved in and the skills you want to use. You will need a deep understanding of what's expected of you to decide whether you do indeed want the job.
  • Cultural fit. Ask yourself if it is a place where you will be happy, challenged, and where you will thrive. It might make sense to do a trial run to see what your colleagues are like.
  • Flexibility, vacation, and other perks. Flexible hours and vacation time are an increasingly valuable perk. During the evaluation stage, it's important to find out whether current employees are afforded such benefits.
  • Other options. Also assess your walk-away alternatives. Think about the offer in terms of the cost and benefit of starting the job search process over again, of staying in your current job, or of first seeing what other offers materialize.