Understanding Stress - Deepstash

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How to Be Better at Stress - Well Guides

Understanding Stress

  • Dealing with Stress is imperative as it is unavoidable in modern life.
  • Our work, family and our finances create daily stress and other external factors (like politics and terrorism) contribute to our stress levels.
  • A little bit of stress is good for you, and even make you stronger, as long as you don't let it rule your life.
  • The power of belief is actively at work with stress, which can harm you if you believe that it can.

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Generosity For Beating Anxiety

Doing things that help others give us the ‘helper’s high’. Deeds like volunteering, donating money, showing up for other people, and even the act of thinking of doing good for someone can release feel-good chemicals in the brain, decreasing stress and anxiety.

Virtual Help

In the times of social distancing and lockdowns, technology comes to our rescue, with new ways to help. Money can be sent at a click of a button, and video calls can be made just to listen to someone in stress, or to provide advice. Every small thing counts.

Gentle morning exercise

Exercising may help alleviate anxiety when faced with a sudden, unpredictable shock.

Spend time with a close friend

According to research, when we connect with friends, we can handle stress better.

Start the day with time outside

According to a study, spending time in nature, or even just looking at scenes of nature, may help you recover faster from subsequent stressful experiences.

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Understanding the emotional brain
  • The neural circuits in our emotional brain - the limbic system and subconscious memory systems - control our emotional responses in daily life.
  • When a stimulus arrives in the brain, it activates either stress-resilient circuits, the internal calmers and healers, or stress-reactive circuits.
  • The brain activates the strongest circuit, which controls our responses.
  • If the strongest circuit is the reactive circuit, our strong emotions get the upper hand, and the stress interferes with the part of our brain responsible for higher-level thinking and planning.
  • The longer the stress-reactive circuit is activated, the more likely they are to activate other stress-reactive wires, which can cause an emotional meltdown of anxiety, numbness, depression, and hostility.
Retrain the stressed brain

The brain learns to be resilient by being resilient. It takes becoming stressed, then use emotional techniques to change the unreasonable expectations stored in that circuit.

  • One technique is to complain briefly. It activates the reactive wire that has encoded an incorrect response.
  • Then rapidly express emotions, starting with a burst of anger (which decreases stress). You can then stay present to your strong, negative emotions. Talk to yourself through finishing phrases like " I feel afraid that..." or "I feel sad that..."