Going all-in on remote work: The technical and cultural changes - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Going all-in on remote work: The technical and cultural changes

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2020/08/work-from-home-05-culture/

arstechnica.com

Going all-in on remote work: The technical and cultural changes
The new way of work requires a new way of managing, whether you like it or not.

8

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Going all-in on remote work: benefits for businesses

Going all-in on remote work: benefits for businesses

Remote work can be costly or cost-saving, depending on how well-equipped you are to really support it.

  • When done right, assessing the appropriateness of remote work for all your employees and implementing the necessary changes will save money.
  • Savings will be primarily in overhead categories: rent, utilities, facility upkeep costs, in-person IT labor, satellite office networking costs, maintenance, property insurance, etc.
  • The point to aim for is where the investment will bear return. Setting up employees for remote work might initially be higher, but can be balanced out by not paying for expensive desk space.
  • Remote workers may enjoy more flexibility, which may translate into increased productivity.

84 SAVES

480 READS


VIEW

Defining roles for a remote work setting

Businesses can categorize employees:

  • Location-independent. Knowledge workers are not dependent on location and don't need to be in an office.
  • Location-frequent. These people spend half their time in an office and half remote. They need an in-person base to use for coordination and physical meetings. These are often salespeople, marketing people, back-office services (IT, HR, finance), and creative jobs.
  • Mandatory in-office jobs. These involve specialized equipment that you can't put in an employee's home, such as manufacturing jobs.

Far more job functions can be done remotely if company leadership will accept it. But, remote work is not for everyone. Some jobs are tied to physical locations or equipment. Some people also do not want to work from home.

75 SAVES

237 READS


Equipping remote workers

In-office employees that transition to remote work need to be equipped. Spending recommendations are:

  • A one-time stipend to purchase some office furniture and other miscellaneous work equipment.
  • Basic ergonomic training.
  • The same class of laptop or workstation they'd get in the office.
  • A monthly stipend to offset some or all home broadband costs.
  • IT support costs.
  • Basic, yet complete tech loadout, such as laptop, secondary monitor, mouse, keyboard, wired earbuds, USB hub, chair that meets ergonomic needs.

78 SAVES

214 READS


Location and paperwork in a remote setting

When an in-office worker moves to a remote role, it's very common for that worker to relocate. However, different states have different employment laws, and businesses are responsible for knowing and following these laws. Taxes are also not the same. Some cities require a percentage wage tax directly payable to the city. Hiring international employees may require a lot more paperwork.

But, hiring remotely can be a huge strength, knowing that you can appoint the perfect person regardless of where they live.

72 SAVES

173 READS


Changing the company culture

Corporate leadership must understand the need to make changes to the company culture that supports everyone.

  • Remote work means trusting employees and giving them more autonomy.
  • Trust does not mean ignorance. Leadership needs to establish clear goals and performance metrics that can be tracked objectively. Data-driven intelligence and project tracking are essential.
  • Onboarding a new batch of remote workers is challenging. You need firm onboarding procedures in place so everyone knows what tools are available and how to use them.

76 SAVES

164 READS


Remote work: working hours

  • Employees should feel that they work at home rather than live in the office.
  • Encourage employees to use their calendar software to establish breaks.
  • Employees should know when they are "on" and "off." It's unfair to expect a remote employee to address a problem at 9 p.m.
  • Don't drop email bombs. Friday at 6 p.m. is not the time to announce major changes.

79 SAVES

196 READS


Meetings and scheduling in a remote setting

  • Make work calendars visible to all.
  • Create regularly scheduled team check-ins.
  • When a meeting includes in-office and remote workers, do not treat the remote workers as an afterthought. Using one microphone for many people in a conference room, all talking at once will alienate the remote worker who will perceive it as indistinct loud noises.
  • When holding video meetings, not everyone will feel comfortable with cameras in their private space. Be accepting of green screens and/or avatars.

75 SAVES

164 READS


Team building for remote companies

  • Bring your teams together once or twice a year.
  • Remote employees should check in with in-office people to keep up to date.
  • Encourage employees to connect in online conversations or hangouts.

75 SAVES

211 READS


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Early times

Before the Industrial revolution, everyone worked out of their home and sold their goods from there. With the Industrial Revolution came the need for automation and factories, and employ...

From factories to cubicles to WiFi

Just after WW2, there was a rise in corporate headquarters and larger office spaces and cubicles. During this time, the 8-hour workday was established.

Then came the advancements in computers and technology that lead to remote workers of today. The internet and public WiFi allowed employees to do everything they would in their cubicle, but outside the office. They can also work all hours of the day.

Remote work is common

4.3 million people currently work from home in the United States at least half of the time, and this figure has grown by 150% in the last 13 years.  

Remote workers tend to have higher engagement rates and higher productivity levels. Once they switch to remote work, they rarely want to become office bound again.

2 more ideas

Why some companies fail at remote work

Why some companies fail at remote work

Companies that fail at remote work focus too much on technology and too little on the process. Successful remote work is based on clear processes that support three core principles.

  • ...

Communication in a virtual environment

It can be difficult to explain complex ideas. The lack of face-to-face interaction limits social cues, which may lead to misunderstandings and conflict.

  • To avoid miscues and misinterpretation, match the message with the medium. Videoconferencing is the next best tool to talking face-to-face. Small, non-urgent requests are best suited to e-mail, instant messaging, or all-in-one platforms like Slack.
  • Frequency of communication matters. Provide regular updates, respond to messages promptly, be available at important times.

Remote work coordination

Remote workers should be working in harmony, but people often don't know what others are doing and how everything fits together.

  • Create formal processes that simulate the informal way; for example, stopping by a colleague's desk or eating lunch together. These interactions serve as course corrections.
  • Managers should clearly articulate the mission, assign roles and responsibilities, create detailed project plans, establish performance metrics. They should also document all that and make it available offsite.
  • Managers should model and enforce the processes until they are completely incorporated.

How Remote Work Became Possible

How Remote Work Became Possible
  • Computers and the internet have made remote work a common arrangement, and this is a recent phenomenon. PC and internet access changed the shape of work in an unimaginable way, and the techn...

Slow Adoption of Flexible Work

Today, remote and flexible work arrangements are seen as a perk.
In 2018, a survey showed that around 3 percent of Americans worked from home on a regular basis. Due to technological advancements (starting with Blackberry), employees were working from everywhere, the subway, the café, home and during the commute.

But even after we have the technology required for remote working for about fifteen odd years, we have been slow to adopt mainstream remote working. The mass-adoption needed a catalyst, and that was provided in 2020 in the form of a deadly disease.

Remote Work During The Pandemic

  • The 2020 pandemic has shown that all remote working is possible, and bosses are no longer reluctant towards it, a forced change due to the present conditions.
  • Many global giants like Google and Twitter have embraced remote work in a big way, in their bid to protect worker health and to reduce corporate liability.
  • The unpredictable nature of the pandemic and an expectation of the second wave of infections can hamper any chance to return to offices.