The importance of giving feedback

Giving feedback to your employees is good for a number of reasons:

  • It allows people to hone their work in a quick and efficient manner;
  • It opens up the opportunity for them to learn from a more experienced worker;
  • It motivates them to go to work and finish tasks.

However, invigorating a healthy culture of providing feedback is a task in itself. It can feel intimidating and a lot like criticism but if done correctly, it allows a comfortable environment that is open for discussion.

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@lailaim23

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Communication

DO:

  • Schedule the meetings early, midway, and at the end of every project to provide in-depth feedback.
  • Don't be shy to bring in experts from other teams.
  • Set an official facilitator and set ground rules for the conversation.

DON'T:

  • Don't overcrowd the meeting. Less than seven is advised.
  • Don't set up a meeting for a finished project, unless there are revisions needed to be done.
  • Don't let the conversation get flooded by too many ideas, only list down those that are important.

DO:

  • Establish a set schedule for everyone in the team to participate for quick updates and feedback.
  • Ask the important questions like: What did you do yesterday? What will you do today? Is anything in your way?

DON'T:

  • Don't prolong the check ins. It isn't the time to discuss what would be discussed for a meeting.
  • Don't keep seated. Stand up, get on your feet and keep your body moving to get energy flowing.

DO:

  • Include everyone who participated in the project.
  • Try to consider using a survey to get everyone's perspective.
  • Use this as an opportunity to have everyone integrate what they have learned from the project.

DON'T:

  • Forget to reflect on the humps that happened during the project and discuss what could've been done better.

Here is how to give feedback to poorly-made projects:
DO:

  • Have a moderator that is impartial for the discussion that can set ground rules for a better flowing conversation.
  • Focus on the timeline of events and facts.

DON'T:

  • Finger point. Instead, send an e-mail containing the summary of the postmortem in a professional manner.
  • Finish the session without clarifying lessons learned and next step actions.

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