5 Better Ways to Follow Up Than "Per My Last Email" - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

5 Better Ways to Follow Up Than "Per My Last Email"

https://www.themuse.com/advice/better-ways-to-follow-up-than-per-my-last-email

themuse.com

5 Better Ways to Follow Up Than "Per My Last Email"
Well, here we are again. You need something from a colleague, but haven't received a response yet. It's time to follow up. You pull up the thread, click "Reply," and have the urge to start typing, "Do you have those answers for me? Per my last email, the deadline was this morning."

6

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

The way we follow up on email

The way we follow up on email

In follow up emails, the phrase “Per my last email,” can be avoided, as it can sound a bit rude.

31 SAVES

57 READS

VIEW

The Direct Approach

The Direct Approach

Just point directly at the request, by circling, pointing or directing clearly to the original request.

45 SAVES

35 READS

Restate the request

Restate the request

You can restate your original request, summarizing in one or two sentences.

If your original email was never read, this will be beneficial again.

35 SAVES

34 READS

Ask a question

Ask a question

Simply and directly asking about the request, or a question related to the request can make the respondent look at your original request and do the required work before you get a reply.

41 SAVES

19 READS

Talk on the phone

Talk on the phone

If you catch hold of the person you require follow up from, you can politely remind them about the email.

If necessary, pick up the phone and call to ask, just saying that you were about to type a follow-up email so thought of calling and asking first.

31 SAVES

12 READS

Drop in and ask

Drop in and ask

This might sound a bit intrusive but it is an effective tactic to drop by their workstation/cabin and ask about the response or action.

Whether you call, drop by or talk in the lobby, do send an email to keep a record of the discussion.

29 SAVES

22 READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Determine What The Sender Needs From You Asap

Ask yourself:

  • What’s the meaning and the value of the message?
  • What action does this message require of me?

Suggested Email Structure

  • Greeting
  • Pleasantry
  • How you got their details, call back and reason for email
  • Body Topic: Situation, Benefit, Call to Action
  • Closing line
  • Signature

Habits For Efficient Email Processing

  • Do – If it’s actionable, execute the task and archive.
  • Delegate – Forward it on.
  • Defer – Decide to do it later (snooze it until a concrete time).
  • Delete – If possible, do it to reduce your inbox.
  • File – If necessary, tag it and set a reminder for later to process items in that tag.

3 more ideas

Find the Fun

To create meaning in your tasks, find out why you need to do them. Then find ways to make each task fun. Owning a task in this way is likely to improve your focus.

Be Comfortable

Don't let discomfort distract you from your work. 


Make sure you have a comfortable table and chair combination. That way you can remain focused for more hours without becoming fatigued. 

Organise Your Workstation

Too much clutter on your desk can be distracting. 

Organise your desk. Retain only the items you need and keep them neatly arranged. Pack the rest away.

Ignore your inbox when you wake up

Responding to emails as soon as you receive a notification gives others the impression that you’re at their beck and call. It also prevents you from reflecting on your own priorities for...

Empty your inbox daily

  • Do. If the email is actionable and takes under two minutes, then do the task ASAP.
  • Delegate. Forward the right tasks to the right people.
  • Defer. Reply to the message at a better time.
  • Delete emails that are not important or that you can delegate. 
  • File. Add messages that contain information you will need to your archives.

Stop CC’ing everyone

To avoid filling the email box of staff members, only CC the relevant parties. Ask your team to respond to you individually instead of using the reply-to-all button.