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7 Strategies For Dealing With Insecurity

https://www.everydayhealth.com/emotional-health/7-strategies-dealing-with-insecurity/

everydayhealth.com

7 Strategies For Dealing With Insecurity
Are you one of the many women dealing with insecurity in today's fast-paced, complex environment? No matter how intelligent and capable you are, work, school and home life can all become challenging if you feel inadequate to cope with their demands. Sometimes others may view you as a competent person, but you actually feel bewildered by everyday situations.

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Understanding What You Feel

Understanding What You Feel
Ask yourself why you have feelings of insecurity in the first place. Determining where those feelings originate helps you discover two vital things: 
  1. That your insecurities have a valid foundation and that you are not silly for feeling insecure; 
  2. That these issues have a logical cause and can, therefore, be logically cured.

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Take Baby Steps To Grow

Try to gradually overcome your tendency to feel insecure by introducing yourself to those situations slowly - as a sort of desensitization process.

If you have trouble in social environments, for example, ask trusted friends or family members to go with you and act as a buffer. 

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Living Without Your Safety Blanket

Make yourself step outside of your comfort zone by removing your usual precautions. 

If you typically interact through e-mail or shop online, try picking up the phone instead. Once you are comfortable doing this, take care of business in person. 

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Changing Your Perspective

Try to think of yourself in another light. Maybe you have trouble handling stress in the workplace, but are you a good mother, wife, or friend? 

Visualize the things that you like or admire and stop looking at yourself so critically. You are likely to be the only person who judges you so harshly.

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Doing What You Know Best

Doing What You Know Best
Find something you are good at doing, and do it. Finding a hobby in which you excel will help you because it relieves stress and builds confidence. You will then have an escape on those bad days when it feels like nothing is going your way.

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Reward Yourself For A Job Well Done

For every goal you reach, have a planned reward. Focusing on the anticipated award helps to take the focus off of the problem ahead.

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Keep A Progress Journal

Buy a high-quality journal and write a list of the goals you want to accomplish in it. Include a list of the things that you find positive about yourself. Write down any compliments you receive and all professional or personal successes.
Every few weeks, go back and read what you have written in your journal thus far. You will now be able to clearly see the progress you are making.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Start a list of the emotions

Pay attention to your emotions as you start to think about eating (you might feel hungry, or have a craving to eat something). Notice your emotions as you eat, and after as well. 

Pick one emotion to start with

Start with the emotional trigger that occurs most frequently. So if you only have social eating triggers once or twice a week, but you have stress or comfort triggers multiple times a day, choose the latter.

Find a healthy alternative

If the need is a way to cope with stress, you need to find some healthy way of doing that other than eating. If you don’t, then the need will become so strong that you’ll cave and eat.

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Anger and Aggression

  • Anger: An emotion felt when we believe we have been wronged.
  • Aggression: is an act of expression of the anger, by our words our actions. Aggressio...

Validation and Boundaries

  • We can try and validate the anger felt by an individual by making them know that their anger is maybe justified while putting firm but respectful boundaries on their aggression.
  • We then need to be clear about what type of aggression we are willing to tolerate, setting boundaries on the unacceptable.
  • We may have to put our foot down and be ready to leave the conversation or escalate the issue, without falling into the trap of guilt and emotion.
  • If possible, we need to restart the conversation when things have cooled down, and diffuse the issue in a calm way.

Avoiding Speculative Self-Talk

Unchecked self-talk can easily turn into self-delusion. The stories we create almost always make you look like the good guy and cannot be termed as objective.

  • The way to get out of this speculative self-delusion is to avoid any speculation about other people's anger, at least initially.
  • Make sure to note down the facts of the situation. This can make the story less according to your gut instinct, and more towards the objective reality.

Don’t try to fix the difficult person

Accept them exactly as they are. 

Accept that they are unable to change, at least at this point in time. Unless you see real change — proof that this person is making an effort&nb...

Be present and direct

Try to avoid getting into a fight-or-flight response, which inevitably leads to becoming defensive

  • Be direct and assertive when you express yourself. 
  • Stay focused on how you respond. 
  • Know when the discussion or argument has accelerated to the point of no return. If it gets to this point, stop the interaction, and leave the conversation.

Encourage difficult people to express themselves

Let them fully state their point of view about the issue/conflict/problem without interruption. What do they feel people misunderstand about them? What do they want or expect from others? 

The idea is to remain as neutral as possible. Just listening may be enough to allow someone to feel like they have the opportunity to say what’s on their mind.