How To Get Rid Of Anger: 3 New Secrets From Neuroscience - Barking Up The Wrong Tree - Deepstash
How To Get Rid Of Anger: 3 New Secrets From Neuroscience - Barking Up The Wrong Tree

How To Get Rid Of Anger: 3 New Secrets From Neuroscience - Barking Up The Wrong Tree

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The Power of Forgiveness

Forgive. Research indicates that forgiveness makes you less angry and more healthy.

856

4.73K reads

Dealing with Anger According to Context

Sometimes suppression is the only thing you can do to avoid an escalation. And sometimes reappraisal can cause you to tolerate bad situations.

But that said, telling yourself a more compassionate story about what’s going on inside the other person’s head is usually the best way to go. 

854

2.56K reads

The Harms Of Holding Anger

The Harms Of Holding Anger

Suppressing feelings works but it makes them stronger. When you suppress, your ability to experience positive feelings decreases while your stress soars as the amygdala (a part of the brain associated with emotions) starts working overtime.

841

2.46K reads

“Correlational studies support these laboratory findings. Individuals who typically use suppression report avoiding close relationships and having less positive relations with others; this dovetails with peers’ reports that suppressors have relationships with others that are less emotionally close.”

English, John, & Gross, 2013; Gross & John, 2003; Srivastava, Tamir, McGonigal, John, & Gross, 2009

688

1.87K reads

The Brain’s Limited Supply of Willpower

The Brain’s Limited Supply of Willpower

Suppressing your feelings uses our limited supply of willpower, meaning you’re more likely to do things you regret after you’re angry.

Meanwhile, neither sadness nor neutral arousal results in destructive risk-taking.

775

2.14K reads

Don’t Vent Your Anger

Venting your anger intensifies emotion. Meanwhile, sharing this feeling constructively or distracting yourself are good ideas.

814

2.3K reads

“…focusing on a negative emotion will likely intensify the experience of that emotion further and thus make down-regulation more difficult, leading to lower adjustment and well-being.”

Handbook of Emotion Regulation

734

1.67K reads

Emotion And Cognition

Emotion And Cognition

Distracting yourself allocates your brain’s limited resources on something else, leaving it less power to dwell on the bad.

Research suggests cognitive and emotional tasks use the same limited mental resources, so engaging in a cognitive activity, things that require thinking impairs your brain’s ability to remain angry.

800

1.66K reads

Reappraisal as an Anger Management Tool

Reappraisal as an Anger Management Tool

Scientific evidence suggests that when someone goes off on you, simply thinking: “It’s not about me. They must be having a bad day,” can soothe anger

Shifting your beliefs about a situation makes your brain calm down the amygdala, changing the emotions you feel.

The same works for anxiety, by reappraising stress as excitement you reduce the former.

866

1.65K reads

“Our emotional responses ultimately flow out of our appraisals of the world, and if we can shift those appraisals, we shift our emotional responses.”

Your Brain at Work: Strategies for Overcoming Distraction, Regaining Focus, and Working Smarter All Day Long

645

1.32K reads

“Reappraisal, by contrast, has no detectable adverse consequences for social affiliation in a laboratory context. Correlational studies support these findings: Individuals who typically use reappraisal are more likely to share their emotions— both positive and negative— and report having closer relationships with friends, which matches their peers’ reports of greater liking."

Handbook of Emotion Regulation

634

1.08K reads

The Dangers of Negative Reappraisal

When you get angry and you think “people are out to get you” you are reappraising, too. You’re telling yourself a story that’s even worse than reality. And your anger soars. So don’t do that.

717

1.32K reads

“… if people can change how they mentally represent a stimulus, they can exert self-control and escape from being victims of the hot stimuli that have come to control their behavior."

Walter Mischel 

660

1.27K reads

Three Quick Steps to Get Rid of Anger

  1. Suppress rarely. You’ll feel worse inside and hurt the relationship.
  2. Don’t vent. It increases anger. Distract yourself, instead.
  3. Reappraisal is often the best option. Think: “It’s not about me. They must be having a bad day.”

913

1.64K reads

Dealing with Anger According to Context

Sometimes suppression is the only thing you can do to avoid an escalation. And sometimes reappraisal can cause you to tolerate bad situations.

Telling yourself a more compassionate story about what’s going on inside the other person’s head is usually the best way to go. 

648

1.23K reads

The Anger Fighting Power of Forgiveness

The Anger Fighting Power of Forgiveness

Forgive. Research indicates that forgiveness makes you less angry and more healthy.

640

1.59K reads

IDEAS CURATED BY

jan_jkk

Interested in leadership and management. Avid reader.

Jane K.'s ideas are part of this journey:

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